The Oklahoma Senate


Week In Review
Monday, May 8, to Thursday, May 12, 2017


Monday, May 8, 2017

• The Senate approved several bills on its first day of the work week, including:

SB 40, by Sen. Micheal Bergstrom and Rep. Bobby Cleveland, permits the pointing of a shotgun, rifle or pistol, or any deadly weapon for acts of self-defense. It also permits armed security guards licensed by the Council on Law Enforcement Education and in the performance of their duties to point a shotgun, rifle or pistol, or any deadly weapon. The bill now goes to Gov. Mary Fallin for her consideration.

• House amendments to the following bills were adopted by the Senate and passed:

-SB 28, by Sen. Roger Thompson and Rep. Avery Frix, modifies language related to the Oklahoma Law Enforcement Telecommunications System. It requires the Commissioner of Public Safety to assess and collect costs and fees from subscribers to the system. It modifies language related to expenditures from the fund and permits expenditures from the Department of Public Safety Restricted Revolving Fund for personnel, recurring user fees, necessary hardware and accessories, of equipment, maintenance and operational expenses of the system. The bill passed 27 to 13.

-SB 170, by Sen. Roger Thompson and Rep. Earl Sears, declares null and void action of the Board of Equalization that would result in the individual income tax decreasing from 5 percent to 4.85 percent. The bill repeals statutory language establishing the process for the Board of Equalization to make a finding that would result in the individual income rate decrease and the requirement that the rate decrease when a particular finding is made. The bill passed 32 to 9.

-SB 370, by Sen. Mark Allen and Rep. Rick West, defines certain terms related to explosives. The bill establishes rules and procedures to be complied with in the use of explosives, with the exception of persons with a valid coal permit. The bill passed 35 to 6.

-SB 424, by Sen. John Sparks and Rep. Chris Kannady, allows interrogatories, the request to produce or permit inspection or copying or a request for admission to be served upon or by any party after the filing of an answer. It allows the aforementioned to be served and answered prior to the filing of an answer upon leave of court or otherwise agreed to in writing. The bill passed 43 to 0.

-SB 428, by Sen. Jason Smalley and Rep. Katie Henke, allows members who retired as active classroom teachers, who have been retired and receiving a benefit for at least one year, and who have not been employed by any public school during that one-year period, to be eligible to be re-employed as an active classroom teacher with no limitations on earnings for a period of three years beginning July 1, 2017. The bill and its emergency clause passed 42 to 0.

-SB 438, by Sen. John Sparks and Rep. Glen Mulready, exempts insurance policies sold to any city or town in the state from the surplus lines premium tax. The bill passed 43 to 0.

-SB 476, by Sen. Roger Thompson and Rep. Earl Sears, modifies apportionment of fees, taxes and penalties collected pursuant Oklahoma Vehicle License and Registration Act by removing the limitations relating to school district apportionment. The bill passed 41 to 0.

-SB 323, by Sen. Lonnie Paxton and Rep. Kevin Wallace, modifies the requirement for a petition supporting a candidate's filing. It requires the petition be signed by not fewer than 2.0 percent of the number of registered voters in the district, county or state, as appropriate for the office sought. It modifies the amount of fees to file as a candidate for certain offices. It increases the fee for presidential candidates who submit a petition supporting their filling from $2,500 to $5,000.

• The Senate Joint Committee on Appropriations and Budget gave its approval to seven measures on Monday, including the following:

-CS for HB 2372, by Rep. Leslie Osborn and Sen. Kim David, adds a $1.50 per pack tax to cigarettes. The bill creates the Health Care Authority Enhancement Fund, the Mental Health and Substance Abuse Enhancement Fund, the Human Services Enhancement Fund, Oklahoma State University Medical Authority Enhancement Fund and the Health Department Enhancement Fund and apportions the first $185 million among the funds for FY2018. It apportions the full amount to the Health Care Enhancement Fund for subsequent fiscal years.

-CS for HB 2377, also by Rep. Leslie Osborn and Sen. Kim David, establishes a July 1, 2017, sunset date for the following gross production tax credit: secondary recovery projects; tertiary recovery projects; reestablished production; production enhancement projects; production of oil, gas or oil and gas from wells spudded or reentered between July 1, 1995, and July 1, 2015; and three-dimensional seismic shoots on or after July 1, 2000. The bill establishes a Sept. 30, 2017, deadline to submit claims for refunds. It provides that claims for refunds for production periods ending on or before December 31, 2016, shall be paid pursuant to the provisions of this subsection. It requires claims for refunds be paid in equal payments over 36 months and requires the first payment be made after July 1, 2018, but prior to August 1, 2018. The bill requires the Tax Commission to provide no later than June 30, 2018, a schedule of rebates to be paid out over the 36-month period to the operator or designated interest owner. The bill also was approved by the House JCAB.

-CS to HB 2347, by Rep. Leslie Osborn and Sen. Kim David, sets a $17,000 limit on the net amount of itemized deductions allowed on an Oklahoma individual tax return for tax years 2017, 2018 and 2019. The House preliminary estimate shows the measure would have a positive $165 million fiscal impact in FY2018.

-CS to HB 2351, by Rep. Leslie Osborn and Sen. Kim David, permits manufacturing facilities applying for the manufacturer's ad valorem tax exemption on or after Nov. 1, 2017, to be eligible to delay the five-year period of exemption from ad valorem taxes following the expiration or termination of the ad valorem exemption, abatement or other incentive provided through the tax incentive district established under the Local Development Act. It establishes qualification requirements. The bill exempts electric power generation facilities from the opportunity to delay the exemption.

-CS to HB 2356, by Rep. Kevin Wallace, Rep. Leslie Osborn, Sen. Eddie Fields and Sen. Kim David, modifies the due and payable date for the franchise tax to May 1 for taxpayers that remitted the maximum amount of franchise tax for the preceding tax year. It provides if the payment is not paid on or before June 1 that penalties will be applied. The House preliminary fiscal impact statement is not yet completed.

-CS to HB 2373, by Rep. Leslie Osborn and Sen. Kim David, adds 15.5 mills per unit tax on little cigars. It also adds a $50 per 1,000 units tax on regular cigars. The bill provides the revenue will be apportioned to the General Revenue Fund. The House preliminary estimate shows the measure would have a positive $3.39 million fiscal impact in FY2018.

-CS to HB 2389, by Rep. Leslie Osborn and Sen. Kim David, authorizes the Oklahoma Capital Improvement Authority to issue $59.555 million in bonds to fund a State Department of Health laboratory.

• House members met Monday and passed the following resolutions:

-HR 1004, by Rep. Chuck Strohm, directs every public official in Oklahoma, including but not limited to sheriffs, district attorneys, judges and justices, the Attorney General, and the Governor, to exercise their authority as appropriate in their respective jurisdictions to stop the murder of innocent unborn children by abortion. It also directs Oklahoma judges and specifically Oklahoma Supreme Court justices not to interfere with this Legislature's right to clarify Oklahoma criminal law regarding abortion according to Article V, Section 36 of the Oklahoma Constitution.

-HR 1017, by Rep. Bobby Cleveland, commemorates the 50th Anniversary of the Oklahoma Department of Corrections.

• The following measures had Senate amendments adopted and were passed by the House. They now head to the governor's desk:

-HB 1121, by Rep. Ryan Martinez and Sen. Stephanie Bice, creates the Oklahoma Integrated Domestic Violence Court Act of 2017. The bill allows any district or municipal court to establish an integrated domestic violence court subject to the availability of funds. The bill defines integrated domestic court to be a specialized judicial process for civil and criminal domestic matters. The bill requires a single judge to preside over the related criminal, family and matrimonial matters. It requires the Administrative Office of the Courts to promulgate rules and ensure statewide uniformity. The bill passed 88 to 3.

-HB 1259, by Rep. Mike Sanders and Sen. Jason Smalley, modifies the requirements for individuals seeking election to hold the office of the county sheriff. It requires the person to have served as a duly certified peace officer in a full-time capacity for a period of four years or more prior to the date of filing for the office. It defines the term "peace officer." The bill passed 64 to 25.

-HB 1282, by Rep. Kevin Wallace and Sen. Dan Newberry, includes professional structural engineer to the list of professions in which the practice without regulation in the public interest is prohibited. It defines and modifies terms. The measure expands the duties of the State Board of Licensure for Professional Engineers and Land Surveyors. The bill requires certain engineers to submit an application and fees for Board consideration as evidence that the applicant is qualified to use certain titles. The bill requires the individuals to have proof of structural engineering experience and education. It sets minimum requirements for individuals to use certain engineering titles and modifies qualifications for licensure. The bill passed 92 to 0.

-HB 1483, by Rep. Leslie Osborn and Sen. Kim David, increases the number of days from three to five business days after a court orders a judgment and sentence for the county to transmit to the Department of Corrections information about the sentence. It adds language requiring the Department of Corrections to establish a method for issuing receipts certifying that it has received the judgment and sentencing document. It also requires the department to notify the county in a timely manner when it receives a judgment and sentencing document that includes inaccurate information from the sentencing court. It exempts the department from responsibility for the cost of the inmate's housing in the county jail until an accurate document is received if a corrected judgment and sentencing document is not received within five days of the notification of receipt of the inaccurate information. The bill passed 75 to 9.

-HB 2008, by Rep. Charles McCall and Sen. Gary Stanislawski, creates the Dyslexia and Education Task Force for the purpose of creating a dyslexia handbook that will provide guidance for schools, students and parents in identification, intervention and support of students with dyslexia through accommodations and assistive technology. The bill establishes membership and meeting requirements. It requires the Task Force to study how to effectively identify students with dyslexia and make recommendations for appropriate interventions. The bill passed 77 to 5.

-HB 2230, by Rep. Glen Mulready and Sen. Anthony Sykes, exempts commissaries for the benefit of persons lawfully confined in the county jail under the custody of the county sheriff from the requirement to give priority to vending facilities operated by licensed blind operators and established by the State Department of Rehabilitation Services. The bill passed 56 to 33.

-HB 2324, by Rep. Jeff Coody and Sen. Paul Scott, allows the holder of a Department of Agriculture, Food, and Forestry permit for engaging in the management of depredating animals by use of aircraft to contract with and authorize other persons to engage in the management of depredating animals by use of an aircraft, provided that the permit holder accompanies the authorized person while engaging in the activity and, if engaging in the activity on private property, the authorized person has consent of the landowner. It provides that any person contracting with or authorized by a permit holder will not be required to have a permit to engage in the management of depredating animals by use of aircraft. It requires the permit be carried in the aircraft when performing management by the use of aircraft. It prohibits the department from requiring the pilot hold a specific type of pilot's license and from requiring the permit holder or pilot to carry liability insurance. It permits the use of any type of firearm. The amendment requires authorized person be made aware of the dangers of firing a firearm out of an aircraft. The bill and its emergency clause passed 75 to 8.

• The House Joint Committee on Appropriations and Budget worked through its agenda on Monday, passing the following bills:

-CS to HB 2372, by Rep. Leslie Osborn and Sen. Kim David, adds a $1.50 per pack tax to cigarettes. The bill creates the Health Care Authority Enhancement Fund, the Mental Health and Substance Abuse Enhancement Fund, the Human Services Enhancement Fund, Oklahoma State University Medical Authority Enhancement Fund and the Health Department Enhancement Fund and apportions the first $185 million among the funds for FY2018. It apportions the full amount to the Health Care Enhancement Fund for subsequent fiscal years. The bill passed 17 to 9.

-CS to HB 2376, by Rep. Leslie Osborn and Sen. Kim David, authorizes non-house-banked table games involving a wheel, ball or dice to be used within the parameters of the Model Tribal Gaming Compact.

-CS to HB 2347, by Rep. Leslie Osborn and Sen. Kim David, sets a $17,000 limit on the net amount of itemized deductions allowed on an Oklahoma individual tax return for tax years 2017, 2018 and 2019. The House preliminary estimate shows the measure would have a positive $165 million fiscal impact in FY2018.

-CS to HB 2351, by Rep. Leslie Osborn and Sen. Kim David, permits manufacturing facilities applying for the manufacturer's ad valorem tax exemption on or after Nov. 1, 2017, to be eligible to delay the five-year period of exemption from ad valorem taxes following the expiration or termination of the ad valorem exemption, abatement or other incentive provided through the tax incentive district established under the Local Development Act. It establishes qualification requirements. The bill exempts electric power generation facilities from the opportunity to delay the exemption.

-CS to HB 2356, by Rep. Kevin Wallace, Rep. Leslie Osborn, Sen. Eddie Fields, and Sen. Kim David, modifies the due and payable date for the franchise tax to May 1 for taxpayers that remitted the maximum amount of franchise tax for the preceding tax year. It provides if the payment is not paid on or before June 1 that penalties will be applied.

-CS to HB 2373, by Rep. Leslie Osborn and Sen. Kim David, adds 15.5 mills per unit tax on little cigars. It also adds a $50 per 1,000 units tax on regular cigars. The bill provides the revenue will be apportioned to the General Revenue Fund. The House preliminary estimate shows the measure would have a positive $3.39 million fiscal impact in FY2018.

-CS to HB 2377, by Rep. Leslie Osborn and Sen. Kim David, establishes a July 1, 2017, sunset date for the following gross production tax credit: secondary recovery projects; tertiary recovery projects; reestablished production; production enhancement projects; production of oil, gas or oil and gas from wells spudded or reentered between July 1, 1995, and July 1, 2015; and three-dimensional seismic shoots on or after July 1, 2000. The bill establishes a Sept. 30, 2017, deadline to submit claims for refunds. It provides that claims for refunds for production periods ending on or before December 31, 2016, shall be paid pursuant to the provisions of this subsection. It requires claims for refunds be paid in equal payments over 36 months and requires the first payment be made after July 1, 2018, but prior to August 1, 2018. The bill requires the Tax Commission to provide not later than June 30, 2018, a schedule of rebates to be paid out over the 36-month period to the operator or designated interest owner. The House preliminary estimate shows the measure would have a positive $46.3 million fiscal impact in FY2018.

-CS to HB 2378, by Rep. Leslie Osborn and Sen. Kim David, limits adjustments to the federal net operating loss deduction to tax years beginning before Jan. 1, 2017.

-CS to HB 2380, by, authorizes the Oklahoma Tax Commission to establish a Voluntary Disclosure Initiative for eligible taxes. It allows a taxpayer to be entitled a waiver of a penalty and interest if the taxpayer filed delinquent tax returns and pays the taxes due beginning September 1 to November 31. The bill establishes eligibility. The House preliminary estimate shows the measure would have a positive $14.6 million fiscal impact in FY2018.

-CS to HB 2389, by Rep. Leslie Osborn and Sen. Kim David, authorizes the Oklahoma Capital Improvement Authority to issue $59.555 million in bonds to fund a State Department of Health laboratory.

-CS to HB 2391, by Rep. Leslie Osborn and Sen. Kim David, establishes procedures for electronic notarial acts. The bill increases the fee for any person filing an application for a new notary commission from $25 to $45 and establishes a $65 in addition for any person filing for an electronic notary commission. The bill requires notaries public to take verification upon oath or affirmation to witness or attest a signature. It requires the secretary of state to maintain an electronic database of notaries public. The bill modifies relevant definitions. The House preliminary estimate shows the measure would have a positive $633,000 fiscal impact in FY2018.

• Several executive nominations passed through the Senate Public Safety Committee, including:

-Joe Allbaugh as director of the Department of Corrections (DOC). Allbaugh succeeds Robert Patton.

Several executive nominations were to the Alcoholic Beverage Laws Enforcement Commission, including:

-Jay Dee Collins, Midwest City, to serve an unexpired term ending June 23, 2020, succeeding Clarence Warner.

-Devin S. Graves, Altus, to serve a five-year term ending June 23, 2022, succeeding himself.

-Harry "Trey" J. Kouri, III, to serve a five-year term ending June 23, 2021, succeeding himself.

-James E. Weger, Tulsa, to serve a five-year term ending June 23, 2021, succeeding Bryan Close.

• Other nominations approved include:

-Allyson L. Carson, El Reno, to the Crime Victims Compensation Board, to serve a four-year term ending September 30, 2021, succeeding herself.

-Phillip J. Cole, Jr., Oklahoma City, to the Oklahoma State Bureau of Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs Control Commission, to serve a seven-year term ending December 31, 2024, succeeding himself.

-R. Benjamin Sherrer, Chouteau, to the Forensic Review Board, to serve a five-year term ending December 31, 2021, succeeding Rand Baker.

Tuesday, May 9, 2017

• Several executive nominations were advanced by the Senate Energy Committee, including:

-Former Senator Ron Justice to the Liquefied Petroleum Gas Board. He succeeds Sherian C. Hilberston on the board and will serve a four-year term ending June 30, 2019. His nomination was carried by his successor, Sen. Lonnie Paxton.

-Kyle Clayton, Chester, to the Oklahoma Liquefied Petroleum Gas Board, to serve a four-year term ending June 30, 2020, succeeding S. Lance Stevens.

-Gary L. Collins, Claremore, to the Air Quality Advisory Council, to serve a seven-year term ending June 15, 2024, succeeding himself.

-Jeffrey P. Taylor, Guthrie, to the Air Quality Advisory Council, to serve a seven-year term ending June 15, 2022, succeeding J. Kelly Dunkerley.

• The Senate passed nine bills Tuesday, clearing their way for Gov. Mary Fallin's consideration.

-SB 445, by Sen. Joe Newhouse and Rep. Kevin Calvey, modifies the manner in which cap on annual credits is allocated and calculated for the Oklahoma Equal Opportunity Education Scholarship Act. House amendments to the bill were adopted without debate. The bill passed 38 to 4. The bill now goes to Fallin for her consideration.

-House amendments to the following bills were adopted and the bills passed during the morning session:

-SB 27, by Sen. Frank Simpson and Rep. Casey Murdock, removes duplicative language regarding the requirement for certain Department of Public Safety positions that the employee have successfully completed 32 semester hours from an accredited college or university and whose hours are transferable between recognized institutions, and received an honorable discharge in any active military or reserve military service. It also changes the requirement for an honorable discharge and honorable active or reserve military service. It reduces the minimum age for someone to serve in the Communications Division from 20 to 18 years of age. It removes the
requirement that the individual have either six months experience as a dispatcher or successfully completed 15 fifteen semester hours from an accredited college or university. The bill passed 44 to 2.

-SB 235, by Sen. Roger Thompson and Rep. John Pfeiffer, provides a sales tax exemption
on sales of tangible personal property or services to any person who has entered a contract with the Department of Tourism and Recreation to assist the agency in the development and production of advertising, promotion, publicity and public relations programs when the purchase is necessary for carrying out the contract. The bill and its emergency clause passed 39 to 5.

-SB 423, by Sen. Marty Quinn and Rep. Randy McDaniel, modifies the number of days of employment an eligible employee has to choose an alternate retirement plan from 90 days to 30 days. Modifies the number of days of employment an eligible employee has to choose an alternate retirement plan from 90 days to 30 days. The bill passed 44 to 0.

-SB 426, by Sen. James Leewright and Rep. John Pfeiffer, assesses a $5 used tire recycling fee at the time a motor vehicle is registered. It assesses a $3 used tire recycling fee at the time a semitrailer is registered. It defines applicable terms. The bill assesses a $2.50 per tire recycling fee for tires used on implements of agricultural equipment for tires less than 19.5 inches in rim diameter and $3.50 for tires with greater than 19.5 inches in rim diameter. It deletes the definition for erosion control project and motorized bicycle. It assesses a tire recycling fee of $7.00 per tire for tires with a rim diameter greater than 19.5 inches and a tread greater than 12 inches. It assesses a $2.50 per tire fee any time a trailer or semitrailer with a tire rim diameter of less than or equal to 9.5 inches when it is first titled. It also assesses a $7.00 fee on certain motor vehicles when titled and a $5.00 tire recycling fee on certain trailers and semi-trailers when first titled. It allows any peace office to issue a citation to a person committing crimes relating to collection or disposal of used tires of a daily fee of $100 for the first offense, $200 for the second and $500 for the third or subsequent offense. It establishes distribution of the fines collected. The bill passed 37 to 5.

-SB 529, by Sen. Jason Smalley and Rep. Katie Henke, modifies the qualifications and criteria required for students to participate in the Oklahoma Higher Learning Access Program. It requires an award for eligible Oklahoma Higher Learning Access Program students enrolled in a postsecondary vocational-technical program offered by a technology center school that meets the requirements to be eligible for federal student financial aid be satisfied for both vocational-technical and college work in which enrolled. It expands to the scope of student ineligible for the program with parents that meet updated income requirements. The bill and its emergency clause passed 42 to 0.

-SB 631, by Sen. Marty Quinn and Rep. Jon Echols, establishes a transportation network company that voluntarily elects to require its drivers to display the company's emblem or logo while in operation to identify the TNC vehicle and driver will not in any way alter the contractual relationship between the parties or create an employer/employee relationship where one was not intended to exist by the parties. It also clarifies language related to insurance coverage. The bill passed 43 to 0.

• The Senate Joint Committee on Appropriations and Budget met Tuesday afternoon and approved the following measures:

-CS for SB 867, by Sen. Mike Schulz and Rep. Charles McCall, creates the Oklahoma Energy Jobs Act of 2017. It grants the Corporation Commission jurisdiction upon the filing of a proper application and to establish spacing rules for horizontally drilled oil or gas wells whereby horizontally drilled oil or gas wells may have well spacing units established of up to 1,280 acres plus tolerances and variances. It requires the Corporation Commission to promulgate rules. It provides specifics for the creation and continuation of any horizontal spacing unit that exceeds 640 acres plus tolerances and variances. It defines terms. The bill authorizes the Corporation Commission to allow multiunit horizontal wells in any targeted reservoir or in more than one targeted reservoir, or in a targeted reservoir and an adjacent common source of supply, upon an appropriate finding by the Commission of the necessity to comingle production from more than one targeted reservoir or an adjacent common source of supply in such multiunit horizontal well, in order to prevent waste and protect the correlative rights of the owners of oil and gas rights.

-CS for HB 2380, by Rep. Leslie Osborn and Sen. Kim David, authorizes and directs the Oklahoma Tax Commission to establish a Voluntary Disclosure Initiative for certain taxes. It requires a taxpayer to be entitled to a waiver of penalty, interest and other collection fees due on eligible taxes if the taxpayer voluntarily files delinquent tax returns and pays the taxes due during the disclosure initiative. It establishes a time frame by which a voluntary payment of tax liability may be made or the taxpayer may enter into a payment program acceptable to the Tax Commission for payment of the unpaid taxes in full. The bill requires the Tax Commission to abate and not seek to collect any interest, penalties or collection fees that would otherwise be applicable upon payment of the eligible taxes under the Voluntary Disclosure Initiative established. It defines the term "eligible taxes" to include: a mixed beverage tax; a gasoline and diesel tax; a gross production and petroleum excise tax; a sales tax; a use tax; an income tax; and a withholding tax. It provides eligibility for taxpayers to participate in the initiative. The bill requires that if the Tax Commission agrees with the proposed terms for payment of the principal amount of tax due and owing, the penalties and interest otherwise imposed by law upon the principal amount must be waived by operation of law and no further action by the Tax Commission or by the taxpayer will be required for the waiver of the penalty and applicable interest. It limits the period for which additional taxes may be assessed to three taxable years for annually filed taxes or 36 months for taxes that do not have an annual filing frequency.

-CS for HB 2387, by Rep. Leslie Osborn and Sen. Kim David, directs the Office of Juvenile Affairs to plan and execute a construction strategy through a best-value analysis of two financing sources. It authorizes the Oklahoma Office of Management and Enterprise Services (OMES) and the Commissioners of the Land Office (CLO) to assist OJA in assessing the best option and proceeding with necessary steps. It also authorizes OJA to pursue one of these two options based upon the input from the OJA governing board, OMES and the CLO. The bill requires a memorandum reflecting the decision of the participating agencies to be transmitted to the Governor, the Speaker of the Oklahoma House of Representatives and the President Pro Tempore of the Oklahoma State Senate by March 31, 2018, or 180 days from such date if the provisions of this act become effective as law later than July 1, 2017. It establishes procedures for best-value options. It also authorizes the Oklahoma Capitol Improvement Authority to issue obligations to acquire real property, together with improvements located thereon, and personal property to construct improvements to real property and to provide funding for repairs, refurbishments and improvements to real and personal property of the Office of Juvenile Affairs sufficient to generate net proceeds in the amount of $45 million. It specifies additional authority of the Oklahoma Capitol Improvement Authority.

-CS for SB 836, by Sen. Kim David and Rep. Leslie Osborn, changes the amount of motor fuel tax to be deposited into the Corporation Commission Revolving Fund from the first $1 million to the first $2.4 million collected during each fiscal year.

-CS for SB 869, by Sen. Kim David and Rep. Leslie Osborn, modifies the distribution of alcoholic beverage tax revenue, requiring one-third of such revenue to be allocated to Oklahoma counties and be paid to county treasurers on the basis of area and population wherein the sale of alcoholic beverages is lawful.

• The Senate Committee on Agriculture and Wildlife quickly approved three executive nominations with little discussion and no debate on Tuesday, including:

-James V. Barwick, Edmond, to the Oklahoma Wildlife Conservation Commission, to serve an eight-year term ending July 1, 2025, succeeding Ed Able.

-Karen S. Dodson, Hydro, to the State Board of Agriculture, to serve a four-year term ending April 26, 2021, succeeding herself.

-Dr. Lawrence F. McTague, Ardmore, to the State Board of Veterinary Medical Examiners, to serve a five-year term ending May 9, 2022, succeeding himself.

• House members approved several measures without any discussion or debate on Tuesday, with all bills heard now heading to the governor’s desk.

-HB 1302, by Rep. Casey Murdock and Sen. Stephanie Bice, ensures no special event license or charitable alcoholic beverage event license for alcoholic beverages be required for an organization, association or nonprofit corporation whose purpose is to promote the common interest of economic development and business growth within a community, provided said event is not conducted primarily for fundraising purposes and services of a licensed caterer are used to provide and distribute said beverages at the event in question. It makes the use, offering for use, purchasing, offering to purchase, selling, offering to sell or possession of powdered alcohol unlawful. It defines terms used therein. It prescribes violations and punishments. The bill passed 79 to 14. The emergency clause passed 72 to 12.

-HB 1388, by Rep. John Pfeiffer and Sen. Eddie Fields, provides requirements to determine the established date of operation for agricultural activities. It permits the defendant in any action in which agricultural activities are alleged to be a nuisance that is determined to be malicious to recover the aggregate amount of costs and expenses determined by the court to have been reasonably incurred in connection with defending the action, together with reasonable attorney fees. The bill passed 89 to 0.

-HB 1392, by Rep. Dell Kerbs and Sen. Eddie Fields, reauthorizes the Oklahoma Wildlife Diversity Program checkoff. It also creates an Oklahoma Emergency Responders Assistance Program checkoff. The bill passed 90 to 0.

-HB 1533, by Rep. John Montgomery and Sen. Greg Treat, requires the State Bond Advisor and Office of Management and Enterprise Services to produce a written debt affordability study for the Legislature and Governor. It requires the study's recommendations and estimates are advisory and not binding. The bill passed 88 to 3.

-HB 1607, by Rep. John Enns and Sen. Roland Pederson, exempts the rear-facing child passenger restraint system requirement prescribed therein in instances of a child passenger being transported by a parent who has been rightfully issued a detachable placard indicating physical disability or a physically disabled license place. The bill passed by a vote of 76 to 11.

-HB1694, by Rep. Scott Martin and Sen. Gary Stanislawski, modifies provision of information to be included in the personal financial literacy education course taught in public schools. It requires the course to be taught during grades seven through 12 before the 2019-2020 school year and from grade nine to 12 thereafter. The bill passed by a vote of 79 to 9. The emergency passed 68 to 16.

-HB 1708, by Rep. Mike Ritze and Sen. Ervin Yen, updates the membership of the Oklahoma Board of Mental Health by requiring two members be an allopathic physician and an osteopathic physician, with both licensed to practice in this state appointed under provided criteria. It ensures at least one of the new members must be a psychiatrist. The bill passed 90 to 0.


Wednesday, May 10, 2017

• The Senate Joint Committee on Appropriations and Budget advanced bills on Wednesday including the following:

-SB 871, by Sen. Kim David and Rep. Leslie Osborn, consolidates the Office of Disability Concerns and the Oklahoma Commission on Children and Youth. It names the agency the Oklahoma Commission on Children, Youth and Disabilities. The bill establishes the process for consolidating the two agencies.

-SB 870, by Sen. Kim David and Rep. Leslie Osborn, permits court ordered payments by parents in support of a child in Office of Juvenile Affairs custody to be used to pay outcome incentive payments for providers.

-CS for HB 2395, by Rep. Leslie Osborn and Sen. Kim David, includes a child of a custodial parent when there is a joint custody order and the physical custody of the child is shared by both parents as qualified for resident status for the purpose of hunting and fishing licenses. The bill clarifies a reference to the director of the Department of Wildlife Conservation. The bill modifies fees for commercial hunting permits, setting a $250 fee for big game and $350 fee for a combination of big game and upland game. It adds exotic wildlife in a commercial hunting area to hunting licenses. It requires nonresidents hunting big game, combination big game and upland game or exotic wildlife in a commercial hunting area to have a five-day hunting license for nonresidents hunting game other than deer, antelope, elk, quail, turkey or bear, which costs $74. It establishes license requirements for residents hunting big game, combination big game and upland game or exotic wildlife in a commercial hunting area. It sets tag costs at no more than $10 per tag, except for females of the cervidae family which are hunted for sport and killed at a commercial hunting area that will be provided at no cost.

• The Senate heard several bills on Wednesday and approved the following:

SB 697, by Sen. Anthony Sykes and Rep. George Faught, declares all rulemaking authority delegated by the Legislature to executive branch agencies be used only to implement law or policy as set by the Legislature. It requires all administrative rules, including those already in existence, to include a specific reference to the statutory provision or federal regulation that delegates the authority for promulgation of such rule within three years. There was no debate on either adopting the House amendments or the bill itself and it passed 34 to 12.

-SB 35, by Sen. Kim David and Rep. Kevin McDugle, permits a person 21 years of age or older on active military or National Guard duty, regular military or National Guard reserve duty or retired or honorably discharged from military service and who presents a valid military identification card in lieu of a handgun license to carry a concealed or unconcealed weapon without obtaining a handgun license. It removes language that provides an exemption from the training requirement for those individuals. The bill adds reserve duty law enforcement officers from the list of those exempt from the training and qualification requirement. It removes language requiring the Council on Law Enforcement Education and Training (CLEET) to establish criteria for providing proof of an exemption. The bill permits out-of-state permit holders to carry unconcealed weapons. The bill passed 46 to 0.

-SB 293, by Sen. Kim David and Rep. Leslie Osborn, deletes specified criteria related to start dates for manufacturing facilities qualifying for certain exemptions. The bill repeals language related to requirements for specified manufacturers. The bill passed 36 to 8.

-SB 635, by Sen. Josh Brecheen and Rep. Charles McCall, creates a gun hunting license for deer for youth nonresidents 17 years of age or younger that will be valid for hunting one antlerless deer allowed during the current calendar year deer gun season at a cost of $30; an archery hunting license for deer for youth nonresidents seventeen 17 years of age or younger which shall be valid for hunting one antlerless deer and expire on January 15 of the calendar year after the year purchased or, if purchased during the deer archery season, to expire at the end of that deer archery season at a cost of $30; and a primitive firearms hunting license for deer for
youth nonresidents seventeen 17 years of age or younger which shall be valid for hunting one antlerless deer during the current calendar year deer primitive firearms season at a cost of $30. The bill passed 38 to 5.

-SB 715, by Sen. Greg McCortney and Rep. Dale Derby, provides a new procedure by which speech-language pathologists may receive a temporary license. It adds and modifies terms used therein. It updates statutory language. The bill passed 40 to 3.

-SB 816, by Sen. Kim David and Rep. Leslie Osborn, requires any student of this state who is in good academic standing with an accredited medical college in this state receive priority consideration in the process of assigning clinical rotations at a healthcare facility that accepts funding from this state. The bill passed 46 to 0.

• The following joint committee reports (JCR) from Tuesday's Senate Joint Committee on Appropriations and Budget were adopted and the bills passed:

-JCR for SB 840, by Sen. Kim David and Rep. Leslie Osborn, increases the fee amount to be paid to the court for traffic offenses from $9 to $10, which would go to the Council on Law Enforcement Education and Training (CLEET). It adds monies related to specimen storage and drug screen service fees to the Chief Medical Examiner Revolving Fund. The bill and its emergency clause passed 34 to 11.

-JCR for SB 841, by Sen. Kim David and Rep. Leslie Osborn, clarifies which monies are to be deposited in the 1921 Tulsa Race Riot Centennial Memorial Revolving Fund and the Urban Gardens Grant Revolving Fund. The bill and its emergency clause passed 45 to 1.

• The governor signed the following measures into law on Wednesday:

-HB 1470, by Rep. Carol Bush and Sen. David Holt, removes the time limitations for civil actions based on childhood sexual abuse incidents and allows an action to commence by the forty-fifth birthday of the alleged victim. The bill establishes a new time limitation for civil actions and removes language related to evidentiary and discovery requirements. The bill adds that any party bringing an action against an individual in which the defendant is ultimately found not liable for the complaint will be subject to treble damages if and when the defendant pursues a counterclaim and receives a compensatory or punitive judgment. It requires damages against legal entities to be awarded only if there is a finding of gross negligence on the part of the legal entity. The bill goes into effect Nov. 1.

-HB 1263, by Rep. Matt Meredith and Sen. Dewayne Pemberton, allows certified reserve peace officers to be eligible for full-time training academy if they have completed the 240 hour reserve peace officer certification program and is hired by a law enforcement agency as a full-time peace or police officer. The bill goes into effect Nov. 1.

-HB 1305, by Rep. Casey Murdock and Sen. Larry Boggs, authorizes boards of county commissioners to issue permits which authorize and regulate the harvesting of hay along the right-of-way of public roads of the county highway system within their respective counties. It requires the applicant for a permit to be informed in writing and to sign a release acknowledging that he or she will assume all risk and liability for hay quality and for any accidents and damages that may occur as a result of the work and that the county and State of Oklahoma assume no liability for the hay quality or for work done by the permittee. It requires any person who stores the harvested hay along the right-of-way for later removal to store the harvested hay at the outer edge of the right-of-way and to remove the harvested hay within two days after harvesting. It grants the owner or the owner's assignee of land abutting the right-of-way priority to receive a permit for their land. It requires the county to charge a permit fee in an amount calculated to defray the costs of administering the program provided that any owner or owner's assignee shall be granted a permit at no cost when harvesting hay on the right-of-way abutting that owner's land. It requires all fees received be remitted to the county treasurer for credit to the county highway fund. It permits counties to establish necessary regulations. The bill goes into effect Nov. 1.

-HB 1427, by Rep. Kyle Hilbert and Sen. James Leewright, creates the Out-of-State Tax Collections Enforcement Act of 2017. It allows the Tax Commission to establish and maintain a vision to be known as the Out-of-State Tax Collections Enforcement Division." It allows the commission to contract with out-of-state, private auditors or audit firms and require any person performing an audit to be first approved by the Commission. It allows the Commission to employ full-time, unclassified, out-of-state tax auditors or full-time-equivalent contracted auditors to staff the Division for specific purposes. It requires the Commission to the submit an annual report to the Governor, President Pro Tempore and the Speaker listing the number of individuals, firms and corporations audited, the types of taxes audited, the amount of taxes assessed and the amount of taxes collected as the result of such audits. The bill goes into effect Nov. 1.

-HB 1431, by Rep. Kyle Hilbert and Sen. Roland Pederson, modifies language relating to the Oklahoma Sorghum Resources Act. It updates references to the Oklahoma Department of agriculture, Food and Forestry. It deletes references to initial election of the Oklahoma Sorghum Commission. The measure directs the Agricultural Extension of Oklahoma State University to designate referendum locations. The bill goes into effect Nov. 1.

-HB 1623, by Rep. Bobby Cleveland and Sen. Rob Standridge, prohibits school district personnel from using corporal punishment on students who are multiple handicapped or physically handicapped unless addressed in an annual individualized education program (IEP) developed in accordance with the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). The bill goes into effect Nov. 1.

-SB 217, by Sen. A J Griffin and Rep. Mike Osburn, requires the court on the day of pronouncing the judgment and sentence of a person who will be subject to the provisions of the Sex Offenders Registration Act, received a suspended sentence or any probationary term, including a deferred sentence, to order the offender to report to the local law enforcement authority in the municipality or county in which the offender resides and to report to the Oklahoma Department of Corrections probation and parole office in the district in which the offender resides. It requires the court clerk to transmit to the Sex and Violent Offenders Registration Unit of the Department of Corrections by facsimile, electronic mail or actual delivery of a certified copy of the judgment and sentence or plea paperwork, Summary of Facts and Sentence on Plea or Sentencing After Jury Trial Summary of Facts within three business days after the court orders the judgment and sentence. It clarifies language related to the requirement that the Department of Corrections conduct address verification every ninety 90 days if the offender has been determined to be a habitual or aggravated sex offender by the Department of Corrections or has been assigned a level assignment of three. The bill goes into effect Nov. 1.

-SB 228, by Sen. A J Griffin and Rep. Mark Lawson, removes the requirement that the Office of Juvenile Affairs implement programs for establishment and continued operation of community intervention centers and instead directs OJA to certify community intervention centers that are established by one or more municipalities or one or more counties or juvenile bureaus pursuant to rules promulgated by the agency. The bill allows a municipality, county or juvenile bureau to enter into contracts or subcontracts with one or more service providers. It further requires OJA to notify a juvenile detention facility at least five days prior to a child's 18th birthday that he or she will remain in the facility pending placement if the child in custody pending placement is court ordered to remain in custody until he or she reaches 19 years of age. The bill recognizes the OJA Board of Directors as the agency's governing body and requires the Board to promulgate rules. The bill goes into effect Nov. 1.

-SB 514, by Sen. Gary Stanislawski and Rep. Dennis Ray Casey, creates until July 31, 2018, a task force to study and make recommendations to the Legislature on costs, eliminating duplicative overhead costs and improving efficiency among school district operations. The bill specifies the task force's study and specifies membership. The bill requires the task force to submit a report of its findings and recommendations by August 1, 2018, to the Governor, the President Pro Tempore of the Senate, the Speaker of the House of Representatives and the chairs of the education committees of the Senate and the House of Representatives. The bill goes into effect July 1.

-SB 543, by Sen. Frank Simpson and Rep. Pat Ownbey, authorizes the Department of Veterans Affairs to construct, establish, administer, operate, and maintain a State Veterans' Cemetery System. It requires the system to consist of one or more cemeteries to serve veterans, spouses and eligible dependents of veterans of the State of Oklahoma. The bill goes into effect Nov. 1.


Thursday, May 11, 2017

• The Senate Joint Committee on Appropriations and Budget advanced a handful of bills on Wednesday, including the following:

-SB 871, by Sen. Kim David and Rep. Leslie Osborn, consolidates the Office of Disability Concerns and the Oklahoma Commission on Children and Youth. It names the agency the Oklahoma Commission on Children, Youth and Disabilities. The bill establishes the process for consolidating the two agencies.

-SB 870, by Sen. Kim David and Rep. Leslie Osborn, permits court ordered payments by parents in support of a child in Office of Juvenile Affairs custody to be used to pay outcome incentive payments for providers.

-CS for HB 2395, by Rep. Leslie Osborn and Sen. Kim David, includes a child of a custodial parent when there is a joint custody order and the physical custody of the child is shared by both parents as qualified for resident status for the purpose of hunting and fishing licenses. The bill clarifies a reference to the director of the Department of Wildlife Conservation. The bill modifies fees for commercial hunting permits, setting a $250 fee for big game and $350 fee for a combination of big game and upland game. It adds exotic wildlife in a commercial hunting area to hunting licenses. It requires nonresidents hunting big game, combination big game and upland game or exotic wildlife in a commercial hunting area to have a five-day hunting license for nonresidents hunting game other than deer, antelope, elk, quail, turkey or bear, which costs $74. It establishes license requirements for residents hunting big game, combination big game and upland game or exotic wildlife in a commercial hunting area. It sets tag costs at no more than $10 per tag, except for females of the cervidae family which are hunted for sport and killed at a commercial hunting area that will be provided at no cost.

• The Senate met on Thursday and approved the following bills:

-SB 697, by Sen. Anthony Sykes and Rep. George Faught, declares all rulemaking authority delegated by the Legislature to executive branch agencies be used only to implement law or policy as set by the Legislature. It requires all administrative rules, including those already in existence, to include a specific reference to the statutory provision or federal regulation that delegates the authority for promulgation of such rule within three years. There was no debate on either adopting the House amendments or the bill itself and it passed 34 to 12.

• The Senate also adopted the House's amendments to the following measures and gave them passing votes:

-SB 35, by Sen. Kim David and Rep. Kevin McDugle, permits a person 21 years of age or older on active military or National Guard duty, regular military or National Guard reserve duty or retired or honorably discharged from military service and who presents a valid military identification card in lieu of a handgun license to carry a concealed or unconcealed weapon without obtaining a handgun license. It removes language that provides an exemption from the training requirement for those individuals. The bill adds reserve duty law enforcement officers from the list of those exempt from the training and qualification requirement. It removes language requiring the Council on Law Enforcement Education and Training (CLEET) to establish criteria for providing proof of an exemption. The bill permits out-of-state permit holders to carry unconcealed weapons. The bill passed 46 to 0.

-SB 293, by Sen. Kim David and Rep. Leslie Osborn, deletes specified criteria related to start dates for manufacturing facilities qualifying for certain exemptions. The bill repeals language related to requirements for specified manufacturers. The bill passed 36 to 8.

-SB 635, by Sen. Josh Brecheen and Rep. Charles McCall, creates a gun hunting license for deer for youth nonresidents 17 years of age or younger that will be valid for hunting one antlerless deer allowed during the current calendar year deer gun season at a cost of $30; an archery hunting license for deer for youth nonresidents seventeen 17 years of age or younger which shall be valid for hunting one antlerless deer and expire on January 15 of the calendar year after the year purchased or, if purchased during the deer archery season, to expire at the end of that deer archery season at a cost of $30; and a primitive firearms hunting license for deer for youth nonresidents seventeen 17 years of age or younger which shall be valid for hunting one antlerless deer during the current calendar year deer primitive firearms season at a cost of $30. The bill passed 38 to 5.

-SB 715, by Sen. Greg McCortney and Rep. Dale Derby, provides a new procedure by which speech-language pathologists may receive a temporary license. It adds and modifies terms used therein. It updates statutory language. The bill passed 40 to 3.

-SB 787, by Sen. Anthony Sykes and Rep. Dustin Roberts, changes definitions related to sedation. It allows the Executive Director of the Board of Dentistry to sign contracts on behalf of the board. It deletes the retirement age requirement for dentists. It allows a dental student intern with a valid dental student permit to work under the direct supervision of a licensed dentist for compensation given provided criteria is met. It requires a limited faculty permit be valid for one year and be renewed by the Board at the written request of the dean of an accredited dental program or the director of an accredited dental hygiene program. The bill allows courses for Advanced Procedures for Dental Assistants to be taught in an online, interactive online, in-classroom, lab or blended format. It requires all expanded duty courses to include a dentist or dental hygienist that is employed full- or part-time by an educational program approved by the Commission on Dental Accreditation and currently on file with the Board. It adds that courses offered in this manner are to meet all criteria in administrative rules approved by the Board. The bill requires that resident and fellowship permits be valid from July 1st through June 30th of each year and Dental Student Intern permits to be valid from August 1st through July 31st of each year beginning July 1, 2017. The bill and its emergency clause passed 46 to 0.

-SB 811, by Sen. Kim David and Rep. John Enns, removes restrictions related to residential substance abuse centers. The bill passed 46 to 0.

-SB 816, by Sen. Kim David and Rep. Leslie Osborn, requires any student of this state who is in good academic standing with an accredited medical college in this state receive priority consideration in the process of assigning clinical rotations at a healthcare facility that accepts funding from this state. The bill passed 46 to 0.

• The following joint committee reports (JCR) from Tuesday's Senate Joint Committee on Appropriations and Budget were adopted and the bills passed:

-JCR for SB 840, by Sen. Kim David and Rep. Leslie Osborn, increases the fee amount to be paid to the court for traffic offenses from $9 to $10, which would go to the Council on Law Enforcement Education and Training (CLEET). It adds monies related to specimen storage and drug screen service fees to the Chief Medical Examiner Revolving Fund. The bill and its emergency clause passed 34 to 11.

-JCR for SB 841, by Sen. Kim David and Rep. Leslie Osborn, clarifies which monies are to be deposited in the 1921 Tulsa Race Riot Centennial Memorial Revolving Fund and the Urban Gardens Grant Revolving Fund. The bill and its emergency clause passed 45 to 1.

• Gov. Mary Fallin signed several bills on Thursday, including the following:

-HB 1470, by Rep. Carol Bush and Sen. David Holt removes the time limitations for civil actions based on childhood sexual abuse incidents and allows an action to commence by the forty-fifth birthday of the alleged victim. The bill establishes a new time limitation for civil actions and removes language related to evidentiary and discovery requirements. The bill adds that any party bringing an action against an individual in which the defendant is ultimately found not liable for the complaint will be subject to treble damages if and when the defendant pursues a counterclaim and receives a compensatory or punitive judgment. It requires damages against legal entities to be awarded only if there is a finding of gross negligence on the part of the legal entity. The bill goes into effect Nov. 1. The bill passed off the House floor 92 to 2 and the Senate 44 to 0.

-HB 1263, by Rep. Matt Meredith and Sen. Dewayne Pemberton, allows certified reserve peace officers to be eligible for full-time training academy if they have completed the 240 hour reserve peace officer certification program and is hired by a law enforcement agency as a full-time peace or police officer. The bill goes into effect Nov. 1.

-HB 1427, by Rep. Kyle Hilbert and Sen. James Leewright, creates the Out-of-State Tax Collections Enforcement Act of 2017. It allows the Tax Commission to establish and maintain a vision to be known as the Out-of-State Tax Collections Enforcement Division." It allows the commission to contract with out-of-state, private auditors or audit firms and require any person performing an audit to be first approved by the Commission. It allows the Commission to employ full-time, unclassified, out-of-state tax auditors or full-time-equivalent contracted auditors to staff the Division for specific purposes. It requires the Commission to the submit an annual report to the Governor, President Pro Tempore and the Speaker listing the number of individuals, firms and corporations audited, the types of taxes audited, the amount of taxes assessed and the amount of taxes collected as the result of such audits. The bill goes into effect Nov. 1.

-HB 1431, by Rep. Kyle Hilbert and Sen. Roland Pederson, modifies language relating to the Oklahoma Sorghum Resources Act. It updates references to the Oklahoma Department of agriculture, Food and Forestry. It deletes references to initial election of the Oklahoma Sorghum Commission. The measure directs the Agricultural Extension of Oklahoma State University to designate referendum locations. The bill goes into effect Nov. 1.

-HB 1623, by Rep. Bobby Cleveland and Sen. Robert Standridge, prohibits school district personnel from using corporal punishment on students who are multiple handicapped or physically handicapped unless addressed in an annual individualized education program (IEP) developed in accordance with the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). The bill goes into effect Nov. 1.

Friday, May 12, 2017

• The Senate met Friday morning before adjourning for the weekend. The session included hearing JCAB bills, House amendments to Senate bills, and executive nominations as follows:

-SB 842, by Sen. Kim David and Rep. Leslie Osborn, appropriates $60,185,000 from the Constitutional Reserve Fund to the State Board of Education for transfer to the Ad Valorem Reimbursement Fund. Measure passed 38-0.

-SB 869, by Sen. Kim David and Rep. Leslie Osborn, modifies the apportionment of alcoholic beverages excise tax collections by removing the Oklahoma Tax Commission Fund as a beneficiary of these revenues.

-SB 870, by Sen. Kim David and Rep. Leslie Osborn, allows a court to order the parent or legal guardian of a child in custody of the Office of Juvenile Affairs to pay outcome incentive payments to providers. Vote was 39-0.

-SB 252, by Sen. A J Griffin and Rep. Mike Osburn, modifies the definition of “victims’ impact panel” to mean a program conducted by a non-profit corporation registered with the Secretary of State solely for the purpose of operating a victims impact panel. The measure also allows the panel to include presentations on the operation of a motor vehicle while using an electronic communication device. The measure requires the provider of the victims’ impact panel to provide certain information to the Administrative Office of the Courts annually. Vote was 40-0.

-SB 748, by Sen. A J Griffin and Rep. Rhonda Baker, authorizes DHS to create a pilot program to improve socioeconomic outcomes for children in state custody, subject to available funding.

-SB 467, by Sen. Dan Newberry and Rep. Jon Echols, modifies the allocation of fees and civil penalties collected by the Department of Consumer Credit. Currently, 80 percent of the fees and fines collected are deposited into the Consumer Credit Administrative Expense Revolving Fund and the remaining 20 percent is allocated to the General Revenue Fund. The measure changes the allocation percentages to 90 and 10 percent, respectively.

• Several executive nominations were heard on Friday, including the following:

o Dr. Judith K. Adams, Broken Arrow, to the Oklahoma Board of Licensed Alcohol and Drug Counselors, to serve a five-year term ending July 1, 2022, succeeding herself. (Health & Human Services Committee) Motion to confirm made by Senator Nathan Dahm.

o Victor F. Albert, Edmond, to the Board of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services, to serve an unexpired term ending December 31, 2021, succeeding Gail Wood. (Health & Human Services Committee) Motion to confirm made by Senator Ron Sharp.

o Keith E. Ballard, Claremore, to the J. M. Davis Memorial Commission, to serve a four-year term ending August 1, 2021, succeeding himself. (Business, Commerce & Tourism Committee) Motion to confirm made by Senator Marty Quinn.

o Michael Sean Burrage, Durant, to the Board of Juvenile Affairs, to serve a four-year term ending July 1, 2021, succeeding Donnie Nero. (Health & Human Services Committee) Motion to confirm made by Senator Josh Brecheen.

o Robert (Keith) Deaver, Broken Arrow, to the Construction Industries Board, to serve an unexpired term ending September 1, 2017, succeeding Michael Liston. (Business, Commerce & Tourism Committee) Motion to confirm made by Senator Bill Brown.

o Robert (Keith) Deaver , Broken Arrow, to the Construction Industries Board, to serve a four-year term ending September 1, 2021, succeeding himself. (Business, Commerce & Tourism Committee) Motion to confirm made by Senator Bill Brown.

o Janice Fox, Norman, to the Oklahoma Employment Security Commission, to serve a six-year term ending July 2, 2023, succeeding Christopher Tytanic. (Business, Commerce & Tourism Committee) Motion to confirm made by Senator John Sparks.

o Samuel J. Haubrick, Lawton, to the Committee of Home Inspector Examiners, to serve a three-year term ending June 30, 2020, succeeding James Gendill. (Business, Commerce & Tourism Committee) Motion to confirm made by Senator Randy Bass.

o Karen Hudson, Ada, to the Oklahoma Employment Security Commission, to serve a six-year term ending July 2, 2023, succeeding Shannon F. Davies. (Business, Commerce & Tourism Committee) Motion to confirm made by Senator Greg McCortney.

o Richard Lueb, Edmond, to the Oklahoma Uniform Building Code Commission, to serve a four-year term ending July 1, 2021, succeeding Larry W. Herzel. (Business, Commerce & Tourism Committee) Motion to confirm made by Senator Adam Pugh.

o Richard Mosier, Claremore, to the J.M. Davis Memorial Commission, to serve a four-year term ending August 1, 2021, succeeding Jack Mayberry. (Business, Commerce & Tourism Committee) Motion to confirm made by Senator Marty Quinn.

o Jason Nelson, Oklahoma City, to the Board of Juvenile Affairs, to serve an unexpired term ending July 1, 2018, succeeding Michael Willis. (Health & Human Services Committee) Motion to confirm made by Senator Ervin Yen.

o P. David Newsome, Jr., Tulsa, to the Oklahoma Securities Commission, to serve a six-year term ending July 27, 2023, succeeding himself. (Business, Commerce & Tourism Committee) Motion to confirm made by Senator Gary Stanislawski.

o Thompson S. Phillips, Jr., Edmond, to the Oklahoma Securities Commission, to serve a six-year term ending July 27, 2023, succeeding Charles E. Newton. (Business, Commerce & Tourism Committee) Motion to confirm made by Senator Adam Pugh.

o Christopher C.E. Ramseyer, to the State Board of Licensure for Professional Engineers and Land Surveyors, to serve a six-year term ending June 28, 2023, succeeding Robert C. Zahl. (Business, Commerce & Tourism Committee) Motion to confirm made by Senator John Sparks.

o Ervin Randle, Lawton, to the Oklahoma Motor Vehicle Commission, to serve a six-year term ending June 30, 2023, succeeding Dan Mullins. (Business, Commerce & Tourism Committee) Motion to confirm made by Senator Chris Kidd.

o Ivenhoe Tom Richey, McLoud, to the Oklahoma Veterans Commission, to serve a three-year term ending July 1, 2020, succeeding himself. (Veterans & Military Affairs Committee) Motion to confirm made by Senator Rob Standridge.

o Billy J. Sharp, Jr., Oklahoma City, to the Oklahoma Board of Licensed Alcohol and Drug Counselors, to serve a five-year term ending July 1, 2022, succeeding himself. (Health & Human Services Committee) Motion to confirm made by Senator Lonnie Paxton.

o Dr. Glenna Stumblingbear-Riddle, Norman, to the Board of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services, to serve an unexpired term ending December 31, 2022, succeeding Dr. Stewart Beasley. (Health & Human Services Committee) Motion to confirm made by Senator John Sparks.

o Dr. J. Andy Sullivan, Oklahoma City, to the Board of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services, to serve an unexpired term ending December 31, 2019, succeeding Major Edward J. Pulido. (Health & Human Services Committee) Motion to confirm made by Senator Kay Floyd.


Other News

• The nomination of Joe Allbaugh as director of the Department of Corrections (DOC) passed unanimously Monday though Senate Public Safety Committee. Allbaugh, who succeeded Robert Patton, was named DOC interim director in January, 2016, before the Oklahoma Board of Corrections formally appointed him to the director position in July 2016. Monday represented Allbaugh's 487th day at the agency.

• Governor Mary Fallin announced Wednesday she appointed Phil Campbell to the Oklahoma Conservation Commission. He will fill the Area II position serving central Oklahoma.
Campbell, a member of the Oklahoma County Conservation District board of directors, will begin serving at the Conservation Commission's meeting on July 10. He was appointed and confirmed last month.

• Governor Mary Fallin announced this week that Oklahoma has received a grant to pursue the Launch Oklahoma goal she put forth in December. This goal is to increase to 70 percent the number of Oklahomans, age 25-64, who complete a postsecondary degree, certificate or credential by the year 2025. Currently, only approximately 40 percent of the state's residents have that level of education or training.

The grant from the Lumina Foundation will provide $100,000 towards enacting evidence-based policies aimed at decreasing attainment inequities among African American, American Indian, and Hispanic populations. It will also provide assistance for targeted promotion of education, training and certificate programs for high-demand occupations among older Oklahomans, as well as lower-income and underserved populations. The grant is effective May 15, 2017 to May 14, 2018.