The Oklahoma Senate


Week In Review
Monday, Mar. 7, to Thursday, Mar. 10, 2016

Monday, March 7, 2016

• The Senate approved 37 bills on Monday as it worked toward this week’s deadline for bills to be heard in their chamber of origin, including the following:

-SJR 72, by Sen. Rob Standridge and Rep. John Jordan, proposes a vote of the people to repeal Article 2, Section 5 of the Oklahoma Constitution, which prohibits the use of public monies or property for sectarian or religious purposes. The resolution passed 39 to 5.

-SB 743, by Sen. Gary Stanislawski and Rep. Casey Murdock, requires the Department of Public Safety to notify all railroad companies whose railroad right of way is impacted by an oversize or overweight vehicle's route prior to the use of the route. The bill passed 46 to 0.

-SB 888, by Sen. Roger Thompson and Rep. Steve Kouplen, exempts grant monies provided to a municipality from any federal, state, or other governmental entity from the income calculation that determines where a municipality are required to have conducted an annual financial statement audit in accordance with auditing standards generally accepted in the U.S. and "Government Auditing Standards" as issued by the Comptroller General of the United States. The bill and its emergency clause passed 46 to 0.

-SB 972, by Sen. Jason Smalley and Rep. David Derby, removes the requirement that an autocycle have a fully enclosed compartment for the driver and any passenger. The bill passed 43 to 1.

-SB 993, with title restored, by Sen. Joseph Silk and Rep. R.C. Pruett, permits mail-in ballots may be counted toward the required 5 percent of members necessary to constitute a quorum of an electrical cooperative if allowed by the bylaws of a cooperative. The bill and its emergency clause passed 45 to 0.

-SB 990, by Sen. Roger Thompson and Rep. Travis Dunlap, permits a person who owns a business with no more than five employees to be exempted from jury duty. Passed 47 to 0.

-SB 1005, by Sen. Brian Crain and Rep. Jon Echols, creates the Oklahoma Achieving a
Better Life Experience (ABLE) Savings Plan Act. The bill exempts account balances and distributions from savings accounts established under the Oklahoma Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Savings Plan Act from the calculation of resources for the purpose of the Statewide Temporary Assistance Responsibility System (STARS). The bill defines applicable terms. It requires the State Treasurer to establish and administer the Oklahoma ABLE
Savings Plan and requires that the treasurer develop and implement the program in a manner consistent with this act and subject to Section 529A of the Internal Revenue Code through the adoption of guidelines and procedures. The bill passed 46 to 0.

-SB 1011, by Sen. Ron Justice and Rep. Leslie Osborn, requires a municipality with a governing body consisting of fewer than seven members to approve the creation of an indebtedness or obligation for an express trust by a three-fifths vote of the governing body. The bill passed 47 to 0.

-SB 1091, by Sen. Rob Standridge, establishes statute of limitations for Medicaid fraud, pursuant to Section 1005 of Title 56 of the Oklahoma Statutes. The bill passed 46 to 0.

-SB 1125, Sen. Ron Justice and Rep. Leslie Osborn, modifies the type of documentation required for the sale of motor vehicles to include a certificate of ownership form, as approved by the Oklahoma Tax Commission and available at the Tax Commission or through a motor license agent. It modifies the type of vehicles to now include those being sold to a scrap metal dealer, pursuant to Oklahoma Statutes. The bill passed 46 to 0.

-SB 1150, by Sen. Rob Standridge and Rep. Doug Cox, prohibits the sale or wholesale of dangerous drugs, medicines, medical gasses, chemical or poisons without first obtaining a license from the State Board of Pharmacy. The bill repeals language relating to illegal acts regarding drugs and the management of pharmacies, use of support personnel and pharmacy technician permits, renewal certification and alternate methods of meeting continuing education requirements. The bill passed 43 to 2.

-SB 1166, by Sen. Brian Crain and Rep. John Paul Jordan, authorizes issuance of subpoenas for records in any investigation relating to crimes committed against the Department of Human Services or programs administered by the Department. The bill prescribes contents of subpoenas, requires compliance and permits punishment for violations. Passed 46 to 0.

-SB 1206, by Sen. Eddie Fields and Rep. Gary Banz, provides for an additional class of
improvement districts for tourism purposes and provides for conditions of the district. The bill passed 32 to 13.

-SB 1249, by Sen. Kay Floyd and Rep. Lee Denney, establishes the deadline for determination of final protective order to be within six months. The bill passed 45 to 0.

-SB 1252, with title restored, by Sen. Kay Floyd and Rep. Jeannie McDaniel, requires information relating to the voluntary compliance initiatives to be included on Open Books website. The bill requires the Oklahoma Tax Commission to produce a report which contains information about every taxpayer who participated in the voluntary compliance initiative and requires the report to be electronically published. The bill passed 45 to 0.

-SB 1283, with title restored, by Sen. Eddie Fields and Rep. Leslie Osborn, modifies the dates when certain apportionments of the gross production tax occur. The bill and its emergency clause passed 46 to 0.

-SB 1318, by Sen. Gary Stanislawski and Rep. Leslie Osborn, allows the Corporation Commission to revoke, suspend or deny registration or issuance of license plates. The bill removes language regarding assessed fees and mileage reporting. The bill and emergency clause passed 40 to 6.

-SB 1327, with title restored, by Sen. David Holt and Rep. Randy Grau, modifies language related to support orders. The bill clarifies language related to filing petitions challenging the jurisdiction of foreign countries. The bill modifies statutory references to the Uniform Interstate Family Support Act. The bill clarifies language related to communications involving a child support enforcement agency. The bill clarifies language related to communications between in-state and out-of-state tribunals concerning proceedings. The bill specifies the Department of Human Services is required to take all appropriate measures to request a child support order for the obligee if the application for recognition and enforcement was received in accordance with statute. The bill passed 38 to 8.

-SB 1336, with title stricken, by Sen. Brian Crain and Rep. Casey Murdock, permits a hospital or two or more hospitals located within a county or adjacent counties, or located within a county or adjacent counties and a municipality, to jointly create a public trust and subsidiary districts for the purposes of submitting to voters of each such county the question of whether to impose a tax for the financial support of hospitals within each district. The bill requires the boundaries of a hospital trust be coextensive with the boundaries of a county or a group of member counties. The bill requires the county or counties, or the county or counties and municipality in which a hospital trust is established, to approve and be the beneficiary of the public trust according to statute. The bill establishes minimum requirements for the instrument creating the hospital trust. The bill establishes requirements for the trust board of directors. It requires that each trust receive approval from the Attorney General that the public trust is in the proper form. It also requires that a certified copy of the public trust agreement be filed with the Secretary of State and with the court clerk of each beneficiary county and municipality. The bill passed 41 to 5.

-SB 1342, by Sen. Greg Treat and Rep. Tom Newell, modifies the Taxpayer Transparency Act. It changes the term "expenditure of state funds" to the term "expenditure of funds" and includes
in its definition state and federal funds. The bill removes outdated language. It requires that the Open Books 2.0 website include data which tracks the expenditures of federal funds by program for the fiscal year 2017 and each fiscal year thereafter. The bill passed 47 to 0.

-SB 1357, by Sen. Jim Halligan, requires the State Department of Health’s Oklahoma Food Service Advisory Council's recommendations include training which relates to food safety in schools and is recognized by a national board, council, commission or other entity specializing in best practices for supervisors of school food operations. It increases the council's membership from 13 to 14. The bill passed 25 to 19.

-SB 1360, with title stricken, by Sen. Greg Treat and Rep. Pat Ownbey, modifies statutory references to organ procurement organizations. The bill also permits a hospital to adopt guidelines for the interaction between organ procurement organizations and hospital staff. It provides that nothing in the Oklahoma Uniform Anatomical Gift Act should be construed as to authorize an organ procurement organization to use coercion or emotional abuse of patients, families of patients, physicians or hospital staff in any aspect of the organ donation process, including but
not limited to the testing and screening of potential donors and the procurement of organs. The bill passed 45 to 0.

-SB 1369, by Sen. Kay Floyd and Rep. Cyndi Munson, defines the terms "homeless children and youth," "runaway," and "youth at risk of homelessness." The bill requires information concerning youth at risk of homelessness and runaways be included in report from the Oklahoma Commission on Children and Youth's Office of Planning and Coordination.

-SB 1374, by Sen. Greg Treat and Rep. Lee Denney, changes the term "life care community" to "not-for-profit life care community" and, among other existing requirements, provides that the term does not include any facility where the endowed payment prior to the delivery of services does not exceed $100,000 or an amount actuarially established to meet the cost of the promised services, whichever is greater. The bill passed 47 to 0.

-SB 1395, by Sen. Greg Treat and Rep. Elise Hall, prohibits the public display of a licensee's personal residential address on the face of any license issued pursuant to the provisions of the Oklahoma Cosmetology and Barbering Act, It allows the personal address information, if publically displayed on a valid license, to be redacted by the licensee until the license is renewed and no longer bears his or her personal residential address. The bill passed 47 to 0.

-SB 1511, by Sen. Anthony Sykes and Rep. Mark McCullough, allows the title of a motor vehicle that is not subject to any lien or other encumbrance to be transferred in a transfer-on-death form by filing with the Tax Commission a written notice of transfer signed by the transferor and designating the transferee. The bill passed 47 to 0.

-SB 1515, by Sen. Rob Standridge, modifies and deletes definitions relating to penalties, civil actions, procedure and jurisdiction. The bill modifies requirements for liability and increases certain penalties. The bill updates statutory references and modifies requirements for intervention. The bill establishes a statute of limitations for action and establishes procedures for intervention. The bill passed 43 to 2.

-SB 1526, by Sen. Ervin Yen and Rep. Doug Cox, transfers powers and duties of the Oklahoma Medical Loan Repayment Program from the Physician Manpower Training Commission to the Oklahoma Department of Commerce by July 1, 2016. It extensively modifies references to the Commission to now reflect the proposed transfer to the Department. It abolishes the Commission, and transfers all responsibilities, authorities, debts, etc., to the Department. It repeals language relating to the Commission. The bill passed 37 to 7.

-SJR 44, with title restored, by Rep. David Holt and Rep. John Montgomery, proposes a vote of the people to amend the Constitution to change the cap on the Constitutional Reserve Fund from 15 percent of the General Fund certification to 15 percent to the amount of the total state budget. It would also require the State Board of Equalization to certify the total amount of the state budget. The resolution passed 46 to 1.

-SJR 64, with title restored, by Sen. John Ford and Rep. Gary Banz, proposes a vote of the people on a constitutional amendment that would enact a new Section 8 in Article 1 of the Oklahoma Constitution. The amendment would require each person appearing to vote to announce his or her name to an election official and provide proof of identity. It would provide that a voter identification card issued by the county election board would also serve as proof of identity. It authorizes the Legislature to enact laws to implement the provisions of the new
section. The resolution passed 39 to 8.

-SB 1095, as amended, by Sen. Nathan Dahm and Rep. Jon Echols, passed 46 to 0. The bill provides an exception from liability for any person with a current motor vehicle insurance policy at the required minimum limits who volunteers to provide transportation that does not exceed the limits of such insurance policy, except for gross negligence or willful or wanton conduct committed in providing such transportation. The amendment, by Dahm, exempts a person who does not possess a current motor vehicle policy when providing transportation from the limitation on liability.

-SB 1341, as amended, by Treat and Echols, modifies language related to the board of adjustment. The bill provides that at any time during the pendency of an automatic stay or a similar provision of municipal law any party to a proceeding before the board of adjustment may object to the maintenance of the stay by filing an application with the district court to lift the stay. The bill requires the court to lift the stay if no parties object to the application. It requires the court to consider and to resolve the matter no later than 60 days following the filing of the application if any parties oppose the application to lift the stay. It requires the court determine whether the stay should remain in effect by considering the likelihood of success on the merits by the party seeking to maintain the stay; irreparable harm to the party seeking to maintain the stay if the stay is lifted; relative effect on the other interested parties; and public policy concerns arising out of the preservation of the stay. The bill permits the court to lift or preserve the stay on such terms as to bond or otherwise as it considers proper for the security of the rights of the parties.
The amendment clarifies language related to time periods in the bill. Passed 47-0.

-SB 1459, with title restored, by Sen. Gary Stanislawski and Rep. Ken Walker, passed as amended 44 to 2. The bill provides that a nonprofit charitable organization which is exempt from taxation as a 501 (c)(3) and which accepts donations of used motor vehicles previously titled in Oklahoma to be repaired and subsequently transferred to another owner will only be considered a motor vehicle dealer when registration and titling of motor vehicles previously titled in Oklahoma and donated to the qualifying organization; procurement and use of dealer demonstrator license plates issued by the Oklahoma Tax Commission upon the qualifying organization providing
sufficient documentation to the Tax Commission; and the transfer of ownership from the vehicle donor to the qualifying nonprofit organization without the payment of motor vehicle excise tax.
The amendment allows the vehicle to be driven for road tests.

• The Senate Health and Human Services Committee gave its approval Monday to three of Gov. Mary Fallin's nominees to state boards:

• Matthew Brosi, Stillwater, to the State Board of Behavioral Health Licensure, to serve an unexpired term ending October 31, 2016, succeeding Bradley McKay and sponsored by Sen. James Halligan, R-Stillwater.

• Beverly D. Coon, Arcadia, to the State Board of Licensed Social Workers, to serve a five-year term ending June, 1, 2021, succeeding herself and sponsored by Sen. Clark Jolley, R-Edmond.

• Tracy Copp, Claremore, to the Oklahoma State Board of Examiners for Long-Term Care Administrators, to serve an unexpired term ending October 31, 2017, succeeding Denise Wilson and sponsored by Sen. Mary Quinn, R-Claremore.


The following bills were also approved by the House:


-HB 1302, by Rep. Ken Walker, permits hand delivery to the county election board of absentee ballots. The bill requires any voter who hand delivers his or her ballot to provide the same proof of identity to the county election board as someone voting in person. It also requires the ballot to be delivered no later than 7:00 p.m. on the date of the election. The bill passed by a vote of 94 to 0.

-HB 2097, by Rep. Glen Mulready and Sen. Bill Brown, states insurers are not required to offer or provide state-mandated health benefits required by Oklahoma law or rule in health insurance policies sold to Oklahoma residents and any insurer in the state will offer at least one policy that does not provide any of the mandated health benefits. The bill deletes requirements for decisions on emergency service, chiropractic and eye care coverage. The bill repeals language related to health benefits; the Health Savings Account Act; and subsidiaries of insurers. It repeals language related to coverage of off-label uses of prescription drugs as it relates to the Kidney Health Planning Act of Oklahoma. The bill passed by a vote of 88 to 1.

-HB 2261, by Rep. Chuck Hoskin and Sen. John Sparks, clarifies statutory language in the
American Indian Arts and Crafts Sales Act of 1974, by defining American Indian tribe as any tribe federally recognized by the Bureau of Indian Affairs of the United States Department of the Interior. The bill and its emergency clause passed by a vote of 90 to 0.

-HB 2503, by Rep. John Pfeiffer and Sen. Nathan Dahm, prohibits the Oklahoma Sheep and Wool Commission from expending more than 35 percent of the funds it receives for administrative expenses and removes all references to the Oklahoma Wheat Commission. The bill passed by a vote of 85 to 0.

-HB 2553, with the title stricken, by Rep. Harold Wright and Sen. Don Barrington, modifies the definition of relocation permit as it relates to outdoor advertising and highway advertising controls. The bill passed by a vote of 91 to 0.

-HB 2651, by Rep. Seneca Scott and Sen. A J Griffin, creates the Oil and Gas Waste Efficiency and Recycling Act. The bill requires the Corporation Commission to work in conjunction with the Secretary of Energy and Environment, the Oklahoma Water Resources Board and the Department of Environmental Quality to implement recommendations of the Water for 2060 Produced Water Working Group as appointed by the Governor; continue developing an energy and industry water-use best-practices guidance and recognition program; and continue promoting and supporting initiatives to increase the use of marginal-quality water supplies in energy and industrial applications. The bill passed by a vote of 91 to 0.

-HB 2747, by Rep. Richard Morrissette and Sen. Kyle Loveless, creates the Oklahoma Blue Alert Act. It defines terms used therein. It requires the Department of Public Safety to develop and
implement a statewide blue alert system. It requires the statewide blue alert system to be designed to rapidly disseminate useful information in a predetermined manner to statewide media outlets. It appoints the Commissioner of Public Safety the statewide coordinator of the blue alert system. It requires the Commissioner to adopt rules and issue directives as necessary to ensure proper implementation of the alert. It requires the Oklahoma Blue Alert only be activated in accordance with policies established by the Department of Public Safety and if all of the provided
conditions are met. It authorizes the Commissioner to notify authorities and entities outside the State of Oklahoma upon verification that the criteria have been met. It requires the Commissioner to annually review the function of the blue alert system and revise its criteria and procedures to provide for efficient and effective statewide public notification. The bill passed by a vote of 92 to 0.

-HB 2756, by Rep. Dan Kirby and Sen. Kimberly David, allows a direct shipper's permit to be issued by the Oklahoma Alcoholic Beverage Laws Enforcement Commission to a winery licensed in this or any other state as a wine producer, supplier, importer, wholesaler, distributor or retailer. The bill states that a permit will allow a winery to ship up to 24 9-liter cases of wine annually directly to an Oklahoma resident over the age of 21 years for their personal use and not for resale. It directs the Alcoholic Beverage Laws Enforcement Commission to promulgate rules governing the application, issuance and renewal of a direct shipper's permits, and includes some general requirements including payment of a $100 registration fee for original permits and a $50 fee for renewals. The bill also establishes guidelines for shippers. The bill passed by a vote of 73 to 20.

-HB 2823, by Rep. Lee Denney and Sen. Jim Halligan, requires that a career technology
program be eligible to receive federal student financial aid and be supervised by the State Board of Career and Technology Education in order for a student to use an Oklahoma Higher Learning Access Program scholarship to pay the school's tuition and fees. The bill and its emergency clause passed by a vote of 79 to 18.

-HB 2835, as amended, by Rep. Jon Echols, deletes age limitation included in definitions for
"marijuana" and "qualifying patient" when relating to Cannabidiol Oil trials to include individuals with Alzheimer's disease, dementia chronic pain, ADHD, bipolar effective disorder, neuropathic pain, spasticity due to multiple sclerosis or paraplegia, intractable nausea and vomiting, or appetite stimulation with chronic wasting diseases to be prescribed CBD Oil by a clinician. The bill passed by a vote of 89 to 6.

-HB 2856, by Rep. Sean Roberts, requires the State Board of Medical Licensure and Supervision to promulgate rules that require an individual who is a licensed physical therapist in good standing and has obtained comparable continuing education in another state to receive a license to practice physical therapy in this state. The bill passed by a vote of 75 to 14.

-HB 2963, by Rep. Jason Nelson and Sen. Greg Treat, removes the exemption of a person, attorney or child-placing agency from prosecution if information provided to the court is fraudulent or false. The bill modifies the definition of services provided by child-placing agency employees. The bill requires approval by the court if additional costs are expected with an adoption. The bill passed by a vote of 87 to 0.

-HB 2967, by Rep. Jason Nelson, and Sen. David Holt, authorizes a school district board of education to enter into a written contract with persons who are student teachers if the district has one or more high-needs school. The bill prohibits a student teacher from entering into a contract the ensuing fiscal year unless certain requirement for certifications have been met. The bill allows the board to choose not to renew the contract. The bill sets requirements regarding contracts for the ensuing fiscal year. The bill and its emergency clause passed by a vote of 80 to 6.

-HB 2996, by Rep. Lewis Moore and Sen. Bill Brown, requires any stop-loss insurance coverage issued by an insurer authorized to do business in this state to provide an aggregate retention of no more than 110% of the expected claims. It requires the Insurance Commissioner to have the authority to waive the requirements for aggregate stop-loss coverage if deemed appropriate by the Commissioner. The bill passed by a vote of 83 to 7.

-HB 3114, by Rep. Scott Martin, R-Norman, and Sen. A J Griffin, R-Guthrie, creates the Oklahoma Teacher Career Paths, Leadership Roles and Compensation Framework Act to promote continuous improvement in the quality teaching workforce in Oklahoma and to give Oklahoma teachers the opportunity for career recognition that reflects the various roles teachers play as educational leaders, a framework for Oklahoma teacher career paths, leadership roles and compensation. The bill sets a framework to accomplish certain goals and salaries. The bill defines terms and requires the board of education of a school district to implement the framework and appoint a site-based review council for each school site. The bill requires the council to fulfill certain duties. The bill requires the Department of Education to submit an annual report. The bill passed by a vote of 60 to 31.

-HB 3146, with the title restored, by Rep. Mike Sanders and Sen. Greg Treat, creates the Impaired Driving Elimination Act (IDEA). It allows a municipality having a municipal court not of record to create a limited municipal criminal court of record to establish municipal jurisdiction over violations of ordinances prohibiting driving, operating or being in the actual physical control of a motor vehicle while under the influence of alcohol or other intoxicating substances. It establishes guidelines for creating a limited municipal criminal court of record, effective on or after January 1, 2017. The bill establishes the jurisdiction of such court and establishes penalties while providing for the remittance of fines and fees. It provides for jury trials and authorizes administrative fees for deferred sentences. The bill provides for the appointment and compensation of judges and specifies qualifications. The bill outlines the powers and duties and explains the procedure for selecting jurors and the conduct of jury trials. The bill requires the courts to comply with the criminal code of procedure and outlines the powers of judges and court clerks. It also outlines sentencing procedures and provides a manner by which to expunge records. The bill also provides for an appeal to the Court of Criminal Appeals. The bill also modifies the penalties and fines for violations to municipal ordinances. The amendment adds a $15 assessment and directs those funds to be used for a DUI database to be housed within the Department of Public Safety. The bill passed by a vote of 82 to 5.

-HB 3157, by Rep. Jeff Hickman, modifies the application for school districts that enter into mutual contracts under the Oklahoma School Consolidation and Annexation Act. The bill defines new terms and prohibits the total amount of assistance paid over the three-year period for a contract with a school employee other than a superintendent be more than $50,000.00. The bill passed by a vote of 66 to 27. The emergency passed 68 to 26.

-HB 3158, as amended, by Rep. Jeff Hickman, authorizes the Corporation Commission to take whatever action is necessary, without notice of hearing, to promptly respond to emergency situations having potentially critical environmental or public safety impact and resulting from activities within its jurisdiction including without limitation the issuance or execution of administrative agreements by the Oil and Gas Conservation Division of the Corporation Commission. The bill and its emergency clause passed by a vote of 92 to 0.

-HB 3166, by Rep. Jeff Hickman, requires the Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education to include their annual report to the Legislature and the governor, information about the budget prepared by the State Regents setting out in detail the necessary expenses of the State Regents for the next fiscal year; the budget requests or proposals submitted by each institution to the State Regents for the next fiscal year; the funding formula or allotment system used by the
State Regents to allocate money to each institution, including a description of the functional goals of the formula or system for distributing funds to each institution and a calculation of any differences in the budget requests amounts for each institution and the actual amounts allocated to each institution, including an explanation for any differences. The bill passed by a vote of 67 to 25.

Tuesday, March 8, 2016

• The full Senate passed the following bills on Tuesday:


-SB 1552, by Sen. Nathan Dahm and Rep. David Brumbaugh, adds performance of an abortion to the list of activities considered unprofessional conduct for a licensee under the Oklahoma Allopathic Medical and Surgical Licensure and Supervision Act. The bill permits the State Board of Osteopathic Examiners to refuse to admit a person to an examination or to refuse to issue or reinstate or to suspend or revoke any license it has issued upon proof the applicant or license holder has performed an abortion. The bill prohibits any physician participating in the performance of an abortion to be prohibited from obtaining or renewing a license to practice medicine. It requires the State Board of Medical Licensure to revoke the license of an allopathic physician performing an abortion and it requires the State Board of Osteopathic Examiners to revoke the license of an osteopathic physician who performs an abortion. It requires the boards to promulgate necessary rules. The bill passed 40 to 7 as amended and now goes to the House for consideration.

-SB 1403, by Sen. Anthony Sykes and Rep. Kevin Calvey, creates the Physician Orders for Life-Sustaining Treatment Act and defines terms. The bill requires a physician's orders for life-sustaining treatment to be executed, implemented, reviewed, and revoked in accordance with the
instructions on a form. The bill sets requirements and provisions to be included in the form and requires certain information to be provided by the patient or patient's representative. The bill prohibits the validity of certain forms and prescribes contents, phrasing, and format of the form. The bill provides for immunity from liability and permits court enjoinment under certain circumstances. The bill updates statutory language and includes references to the Act. The bill requires the State Board of Medical Licensure and Supervision to prepare from time to time revise and make available on the Board's website an online presentation. It sets requirements for the online presentation. It sets requirements for inpatient health services entities to ensure before reviewing and preparing any Oklahoma physician orders for life-sustaining treatment. The bill passed 28 to 17 and now moves to the House for consideration.

-SB 900, by Sen. Corey Brooks and Rep. Jeff Coody, modifies the exemption from motor vehicle excise tax exemption for 100 percent disabled veterans of the U.S. Armed Forces. The bill permits the exemption to be utilized more than one time every three years when the vehicle is a replacement for a vehicle that was destroyed and declared by the insurer to be a total loss claim. The bill passed 42 to 0.

-SB 983, by Sen. Roger Thompson and Rep. Scott Martin, creates the nine-member Health Information Technology Advisory Board to provide guidance related to health information technology and act in an advisory capacity to the Chief Information Officer and to advise in the development of a long-range plan for health information technology including, but not limited to, the use of electronic health records, statewide data sharing interchanges among health information exchanges, health information service providers and other methods of incorporating and monitoring information technology in pursuit of protecting the privacy of patient personal and
healthcare information, greater cost-effectiveness and better patient outcomes in healthcare. It requires that each appointed member serve a three year term. It establishes procedures for removing appointees. The bill establishes the advisory board's membership and requires that it meet no less than four times per year. It requires that an organization meeting be held prior to Dec. 1, 2016, and that the meeting be called by the Chief Information Officer. It establishes quorum and voting requirements. The bill establishes duties and responsibility of advisory board
members. It requires that the advisory board act in accordance with the provisions of the Oklahoma Open Meeting Act, the Oklahoma Open Records Act and the Administrative Procedures Act. The bill passed 38 to 5.

-SB 1071, by Sen. Dan Newberry and Katie Henke, exempts a rental residence occupant who has no rental agreement with the landlord and with whom the landlord has not consented to creating a tenancy from the provisions of the Oklahoma Residential Landlord and Tenant Act. The bill grants a landlord the right to demand that such an occupant vacate the dwelling unit or the premises or both and provides the landlord will not be required to commence eviction proceedings. It provides that if the occupant wrongfully fails to comply within a reasonable time, the occupant will, upon conviction, be guilty of a trespass and may be punished by a fine not to exceed $500 or by confinement in the county jail for a period not to exceed 30 days or by both fine and imprisonment. The bill passed 45 to 0.

-SB 1083, by Sen. Dan Newberry and Rep. Jon Echols, modifies the use of the affidavit of exemption relating to workers' compensation insurance under the Roofing Contractor Registration Act. The bill requires the exemption to be used only for residential construction projects, while all commercial projects are required to cover all individuals performing work to be covered by workers' compensation insurance as employees of the person registered under the Roofing Contractor registration Act. The bill allows any day laborer with proof of workers' compensation insurance under a temporary labor agency to provide an affidavit from the agency. The bill prohibits any homeowner from being held liable for injury or death to any person who performs work under a contract with a person required by law to be registered under the Roofing Contractor Registration Act. The bill passed 44 to 2.

-SB 1297, by Sen. Josh Brecheen and Rep. Mark McCullough, adds the definition of a private school under the Oklahoma Campus Security Act, which allows them to set up their own police department. The bill passed 45 to 0.

-SB 1371, with title restored, by Sen. Kimberly David and Rep. Pat Ownbey, removes language that sets the rate of reimbursement from the Office of Juvenile Affairs to counties to renovate existing juvenile detention facilities, to construct new juvenile detention facilities, to operate juvenile detention facilities and otherwise provide for secure juvenile detention services and alternatives to secure detention. The bill removes outdated language. The bill also removes language that required a certain number of beds to be located in particular places. The bill requires OJA to promulgate necessary rules. The bill passed 39 to 0.

-SB 1386, by Sen. Kim David and Rep. Glen Mulready, authorizes the creation and submission of a State Innovation Waiver for the purpose of creating Oklahoma health insurance products that improve health and health care quality while controlling costs. It provides that the State Innovation Waiver may include multiple waiver submissions under federal waiver authorities. It requires the waiver to be created consistent with the innovation design plan developed through the Oklahoma Health Improvement Plan. It requires it be presented to the Oklahoma Legislature along with
a summary of comments received from public hearings and requires the inclusion of the identification of specific provisions of the Affordable Care Act to be waived in the State of Oklahoma. The bill requires participating agencies, including but not limited to the State Department of Health, the Oklahoma Health Care Authority, the Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services and the Insurance Department, to develop the State Innovation
Waiver and submit any and all necessary information for approval to all relevant entities. It directs the Insurance Department to conduct rate review for the individual and small group health insurance market upon implementation of the State Innovation Waiver. The bill passed 41 to 0.

-SB 1424, by Sen. Kim David and Rep. Pat Ownbey, requires the Office of Juvenile Affairs to require national criminal history records searches for operators making a request to establish a detention center municipal juvenile facility, community intervention center or secure facility licensed or certified by the Office of Juvenile Affairs. The bill also requires national criminal history records searches for employee or applicant of a secure detention center, municipal juvenile facility, community intervention center or secure facility licensed or certified by the Office of
Juvenile Affairs and persons allowed unsupervised access to children. The bill passed 38 to 0.

-SB 1506, by Sen. Kim David, allows a residential care home, upon written request to the State Department of Health, to participate in an informal dispute resolution panel or an alternate dispute resolution panel. The bill defines terms and requires the Department to appoint the panel according to certain criteria. The bill passed 42 to 0.

-SB 1507, with title restored, by Sen. Kim David, authorizes the Director of the Office of Disability Concerns to purchase cards for invoices relating to telecommunication services. The bill passed 43 to 1.

-SJR 65, with title restored, by Sen. Greg Treat and Rep. Elise Hall, proposes a vote of the people on a constitutional amendment that directs the Governor to appoint the Commissioner
of Labor. The amendment would provide that the appointment would be for a four-year term concurrent with that of the Governor. It removes term limits for members of the Commissioner of Labor. The resolution passed 33 to 13.

-SB 1179, by Sen. Jason Smalley and Rep. Doug Cox, expands definitions used in the Oklahoma Medical Loan Repayment Program to include health center and teaching health center. The amendment permits the Physician Manpower Training Commission to accept donations of public or private funds to assist in funding the Medical Loan Repayment Program. It also permits the commission to contract with other public entities and non-profit corporations for the endowment, management and administration of such funds

-SB 1388, by Sen. Kim David and Rep. Doug Cox, allows the Grand River Dam Authority to make reasonable regulations governing, and in the interest of defraying costs associated with the
maintenance and policing of public lands administered by the district, prescribe reasonable fees for camping and the use of district facilities, and for the use of off-road and all-terrain vehicles on district lands. The amendment requires any fees collected be used for improvements on public lands. The bill passed 27-17 as amended.

-FS for SB 1431, by Sen. Jason Smalley and Rep. Dennis Ray Casey, requires the State Board of Education to establish a process to identify schools in the state that are persistently listed as low performing in accordance with federal law. It requires that a district board of education for a school identified as being among the schools in the state that are persistently in low performing to implement a locally developed, evidence-based intervention model for the school. It requires the district board of education of such school to seek state support from the State Department of Education if the school is identified for improvement by the State Board for four consecutive years. It specifics what constitutes state support and how long the school is allowed to receive it. It authorizes the State Board to assume control over schools. It requires the State Department
of Education to annually submit a report of the district plans received as provided therein to the members of the Senate and House Education Committees. It passed without discussion or debate by a vote of 32-11.

-SB 16, with title restored, by Sen. Eddie Fields and Rep. John Enns, permits the Oklahoma
Water Resources Board to meet nine times per calendar year at the discretion of the chair with not more than two consecutive calendar months between meetings instead of requiring that it meet monthly. The bill and its emergency clause passed 37 to 0. The emergency clause failed 25 to 11. A two-thirds vote is necessary for approval of an emergency clause.

-SB0735, with title restored, by Sen. Kimberly David and Rep. David Derby, allows a person 21
years or older who is on active military duty, National Guard duty, regular military or National Guard reserve duty or has retired or been honorably discharged from military service to carry a concealed or unconcealed firearm if the person presents a valid military identification card in lieu of a handgun license. The bill passed 37to 2.

-SB 955, with title restored, by Sen. Gary Stanislawski, removes the requirement that certain
Grand River Dam Authority employees be classified employees and permits the authority to employ unclassified personnel as deemed necessary by the board of directors. The bill and its emergency clause passed 42 to 0.

-SB 1016, by Sen. David Holt and Rep. Gary Banz, requires a voter registration applicant to affirmatively consent to the use of his or her driver license or identification card record and signature for voter registration purposes. The bill requires the State Election Board Secretary to compare the information in the record of the applicant's driver license or identification card of the Department of Public Safety with the information submitted on the application and ensures that the information on the application substantially matches the information in the driver license or identification card record. It requires that the digital signature contained in the driver license or identification card record of the applicant be obtained from the Department of Public Safety and
included on the application and the application be processed as provided by law if the Secretary finds that the application is in compliance with the act and all applicable laws relating to voter registration. The bill passed 42 to 0.

-SB 1059, by Sen. Gary Stanislawski and Rep. Leslie Osborn, modifies revenue apportionment of overweight fees and fines for motor vehicles. The bill modifies operational hours of the operation of weigh stations from 24 hours a day to 18 to 20 hours a day. The bill passed 38 to 1.

-SB 1060, by Sen. Mark Allen and Rep. George Faught, authorizes circuit engineering districts to establish a financing and lease purchase agreement program for road machinery and equipment to be utilized by participating counties. It allows the circuit engineering district to promulgate rules to assist in developing cooperative and affordable financing and coordinating participating counties with eligible financial solutions. The bill passed 42 to 0.

-SB 1240, by Sen. Mike Mazzei and Rep. Weldon Watson, creates the Oklahoma Public Safety
Protection District Act. The bill allows the largest municipality within the county may initiate the creation of a public safety protection district by the adoption of a joint resolution calling for the question of whether to organize a public safety protection district. The bill requires all territory located within the municipality to be included in the district. The bill requires management of the public safety protection district, as well as management of any employee hired from district funds to be vested within the existing administration of the municipal government. It requires budgetary
oversight to be vested within the existing legislative body of the municipal government that created the district. The bill establishes rules for the appointment of a district director of public safety and the board and establishes duties and powers of the director and the board. The bill passed 25 to 17.

-SB 1340, by Sen. A J Griffin and Rep. David Derby, authorizes the Oklahoma Health Care Authority to develop and implement a premium assistance plan to assist eligible Oklahomans in purchasing a health savings account plan under the Oklahoma Medicaid Program Reform Act of 2003. It also requires the Oklahoma Department of Commerce to conduct a wage audit for employers participating in the Insure Oklahoma program to ensure that wages for participants are comparable to prevailing wages. The bill requires the Department of Commerce to prepare an annual report to be presented to the Senate President Pro Tempore of the Senate and the House Speaker. The bill passed 37 to 0.

-SB 1448, by Sen. Nathan Dahm and Rep. Sean Roberts, changes the name of the Home Bakery Act of 2013 to the Right to Commerce Act. The bill clarifies language related to ability of a producer of eggs to sale eggs. It exempts Oklahoma producers of eggs from certain provisions of Title 2 and provides that the statute does not prohibit the sale of eggs produced on the farm or property and sold directly to the consumer. It requires that the eggs sold be produced by hens maintained on the farm or property from which the eggs are sold. It limits the size of a flock to no
more than 30 hens. The bill defines applicable terms. The bill modifies the definition of the term "home food establishment" to include those that make product available for resale at farmer's markets, on site, cooperatives, membership-based buying clubs or for delivery. The bill also modifies the income limit from $20,000 gross annual sales to $50,000 annual net income. The bill modifies the requirements for a label that must be attached to foods produced by a home food establishment. The bill requires home food establishments to submit certain information to the Department of Health upon any instance of food-borne illness attributable to its products. It requires an annual certificate of food safety training for the home food establishment to be on display at the point of sale. The bill authorizes the Department of Health to inspect home food establishment operations in response to instances of food-borne illness and to order and enforce remedial action including cessation of operations as necessary to protect the public against health hazards. The bill requires the cessation of operations to continue until the operator of the home food establishment provides documentation of successful completion of additional food safety training. The bill passed 32 to 8.

-SB 1477, with title stricken, by Sen. Ervin Yen and Rep. Doug Cox, modifies definitions and references to specific organizations under the Oklahoma Sleep Diagnostic Testing Regulation Act and restores stricken language. The bill passed 40 to 0.


• The House passed several bills on Tuesday, including:

-HB 2337, by Rep. Paul Wesselhoft and Sen. Robert Standridge, creates the Oklahoma
Unmanned Aerial Surveillance Act, which requires any use of an unmanned aerial vehicle to comply with all Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) requirements. The bill prohibits an agent of the state or any political subdivision of the state to operate an unmanned aerial vehicle or to disclose or receive information acquired through the operation of an unmanned aerial vehicle under certain circumstances. The bill prohibits unmanned aerial vehicles from being equipped with weapons except when used by duly authorized members, agents or contractors of the Department of Defense or the United States military. The bill prohibits information acquired by an unmanned aerial vehicle from being used as evidence in any trial, hearing or proceeding unless an emergency situation is determined to exist. The bill requires violation of the Act to be punishable as a misdemeanor with a sentence up to six months in the county jail and a fine of between $250 and $2,500 per violation. The bill passed by a vote of 56 to 40, with Wesselhoft serving notice to reconsider the vote by which it passed.

-HB 2262, by Rep. Chuck Hoskin and Sen. Randy Bass, creates the Freedom to Display the
American Flag Act, which prevents a home owners association, condominium association, cooperative association or residential real estate management association from adopting or enforcing any policy that would restrict or prevent a member of the association from displaying the flag of the United States at a reasonable height, not to exceed 20 feet, on their residential property within the association. The bill and its emergency clause passed by a vote of 91 to 0.

-HB 2599, by Rep. Justin Wood, defines critical infrastructure facilities and other terms. The bill
prohibits a person from intentionally and knowingly operating an unmanned aircraft over a critical infrastructure facility if the unmanned aircraft is less than 400 feet above ground level; allowing an unmanned aircraft to make contact with a critical infrastructure facility, including any person or object on the premises of or within the facility; or allowing an unmanned aircraft to come within a distance of a critical infrastructure facility that is close enough to interfere with the operations of or cause a disturbance to the facility. The bill establishes exemptions. The bill sets punishment for violations at a $500 fine or imprisonment for up to one year or both. The bill passed by a vote of 92 to 2.

-HB 2616, as amended, by Rep. Todd Thomsen, modifies language related to the Oklahoma Telecommunications Act of 1997. The bill updates language related to the Oklahoma Universal Service Fund (OUSF). The bill modifies the procedure for eligible providers to seek and obtain funding and allows the OUSF administrator to issue a determination within 60 days of the receipt of a request. The bill allows 15 days to file a request for reconsideration. The bill adds and modifies definitions relating to the measure. The bill deletes language relating to services declared to be Special Universal Services and redefines terms and conditions. The bill allows
the Corporation Commission to investigate each request for funding. The bill outlines the beneficiary approval process and the eligible provider reimbursement process. The bill passed by a vote of 69 to 25. The emergency clause passed by a vote of 73 to 19.

-HB 2658, by Rep. Casey Murdock and Sen. Bryce Marlatt, requires the Commissioners of
the Land Office to make a payment in lieu of ad valorem taxes with respect to real property located in any county of the state if title to more than 10 percent of all real property in the county, as measured by acreage, is held by the Commissioners of the Land Office, effective Nov. 1, 2016. It requires the in lieu payment be made only if a lease for real property located in the county is being initiated or renewed. It requires the in lieu payment be equal to the rate of
ad valorem tax applicable to agricultural lands located in the county. It requires the county assessor of each county to which payment is owed to make a determination of the average tax rate per acre for agricultural land in the county for the preceding assessment year and shall communicate that information to the Commissioners of the Land Office not later than September 1 each year. It requires the Commissioners of the Land Office to make the required payment to the county treasurer of the county not later than December 31 each year. It requires the Commissioners of the Land Office to include the in lieu payment required by provisions therein as part of the minimum bidding requirement for the lease of real property located in that county and for which a lease is being initiated or renewed. It requires the in lieu payment amount to be included in the computation of the applicable lease payment for the full duration of such lease term and shall be included in the computation each time a lease is initiated or renewed. The
bill passed by a vote of 75 to 14.

-HB 2720, as amended, by Rep. Emily Virgin, requires all votes by the board of education of a school district relating to converting all or part of a traditional public school site to a conversion charter school be held in an open public session. The bill requires a conversion charter school to comply with all accountability measures that are required of the traditional public schools in the school district according to state and federal law. It adds that a conversion charter school be effective for five years from the first day of operation or for less than five years if determined by a vote of the board of education of the school district. It allows a conversion charter school to
continue to operate for successive five-year terms of duration subject to approval by a vote of the board of education of the school district. The bill also allows the governing board of a conversion charter school identified as being among the bottom 5 percent of public schools in the state to convert back to a traditional public school. It states that if the decision of the governing body of a conversion charter school is overturned by the State Board of Education, the Board may require the board of education of the school district for the conversion charter school to convert the
conversion charter school back to a traditional public school and can prohibit the approval of another conversion within the same school district for a period of not less than five years. The bill and its emergency clause passed by a vote of 76 to 19.

-HB 2801, as amended, by Rep. Scooter Park, modifies qualifications for correctional officers. The bill allows officers who have been reinstated within three years to repeat the pre-service training requirement. The bill passed by a vote of 92 to 0.

-HB 2803, by Rep. David Derby, increases the age from 23 to 26 and adds enrollment at a technology center as qualifying characteristics of the waiver the Oklahoma Health Care Authority is required to apply for to extend health care benefits. The bill passed by a vote of 84 to 6.

-HB 2929, by Rep. Jason Dunnington and Sen. Kyle Loveless, clarifies language related to discriminatory wages. It makes it unlawful for an employer to discharge or in any other manner
discriminate against an employee because: the employee has inquired about, discussed or disclosed the wages of the employee or another employee; the employee has made a wage claim or discussed, inquired about or consulted an attorney or agency about a wage claim; the employee has caused to be instituted any proceedings under or related to this act; or the employee has testified or is about to testify in any such proceedings. It increases the fines for violations of the provisions from no less than $25 to no more than $100 to no less than $50 to no more than $200 for each separate violation per pay period. The bill passed by a vote of 59 to 32.

-HB 2957, as amended, by Rep. Michael Rogers, removes references to quantitative components
in the TLE. The bill adds a required component of professional development for all teachers and administrators by the school districts and lists the criteria for it. The bill requires school districts to monitor compliance and requires that all professional development completed pursuant to a professional development plan count towards the total number of points a teacher or administrator is required to complete. It adds that the implementation of the professional development plan requirements are not be construed as increasing the professional development
points requirement. It requires professional development plans to include certain learning practices. The bill allows a local elected school board to adopt additional components and procedures. It also allows every policy adopted to include a five-tier rating system and provides examples. The bill allows all certified personnel to be evaluated through formal or informal observations by a principal, assistant principal, designee of the principal, supervisor, content expert, department chair, an outside company, peer committee or person or group of persons designated by the school district board of education. The bill removes language related to the TLE Commission and the schedule for implementation of the TLE. The bill and its emergency clause passed by a vote of 94 to 0.

-HB 3120, by Rep. Scott Martin, authorizes the Department of Securities to enter into contracts and agreements for the payment of food, lodging, meeting facility, facilitator fees and travel expenses, exhibitor fees and other authorized expenses as may be necessary to host, conduct, sponsor or participate in conferences, meetings, training sessions or initiatives promoting or otherwise relating to investor education. The bill passed by a vote 59 to 36. The emergency clause failed 40 to 37.

HB 2585, by Rep. Mark Lepak and Sen. Wayne Shaw, prohibits any person from being disqualified from pursing, practicing or engaging in any occupation for which a license is required solely or in part because of a prior conviction, unless it is a conviction directly related to the occupation for which the license is sought. The measure was approved 59 to 31.

-HB 2387, by Rep. Claudia Griffith and Sen. A J Griffin, authorizes the Oklahoma Health Care
Authority to seek a waiver to expand premium assistance programs to include certain full-time-equivalent employees.

-HB 1553, as amended, by Rep. Earl Sears and Sen. Mike Mazzei, creates the Heavy Equipment Rental Tax Act. The bill levies a rental tax of 1% on the rental price of all qualified heavy equipment rented by a qualified renter or individual, and requires that such tax be in lieu of ad valorem taxes upon such equipment. The amendment takes out language regarding exemptions for tax for government entities. The bill passed by a vote of 55 to 30.

-HB 2391, by Rep. Ben Sherrer and Sen. Patrick Anderson, exempting preplacement home study for child living with grandparent for not less than one year as of the date the petition for adoption is filed. It also waives the requirement that a home study report be made if the child to be adopted is the biological or adopted child of the spouse of the petitioner or the grandchild of either of the petitioners.

-HB 2427, by Rep. Sally Kern and Sen. Nathan Dahm, updates and modifies definition to "handguns" and "concealed handgun" in relation to the Oklahoma Firearms Act of 1971 and the
Oklahoma Self-Defense Act. The bill passed by a vote of 87 to 4.

-HB 2614, by Rep. Todd Thomsen, adds an exclusion for public schools to not provide education services in the regular school setting for a student who has been removed from a public or private school in the state or another state by administrative or judicial process for an act of using electronic communication with intent to terrify, intimidate or harass, or threaten to inflict injury or physical harm to faculty or other students. The bill and its emergency clause passed by a vote of 83 to 1.

-HB 3156, by Rep. Jeff Hickman, allows a school district that has received an average grade of C or above on the annual school reports prepared by the State Board of Education to elect to be exempt from all statutory requirements and State Board rules that charter schools are exempt from by adoption of a resolution by the board of education of the school district. It directs that prior to adoption of a resolution, the board will give notice of the proposed action which includes a list of the statutory requirements or mandates and State Board rules from which the board is proposing to be exempt and will also provide for a period of public review and comment. The bill passed by a vote of 81 to 13.

-HB 3159, by Rep. Jeff Hickman, provides that once a person has served 85 percent of the sentence imposed, the person shall be placed on the first available parole docket of the Pardon and Parole Board immediately following the date upon which the person has served the required term of imprisonment. It adds that in no instance shall the number of earned credits accumulated by a person exceed 5 percent of the total number of days of the prison sentence of the person. It allows the Department of Corrections to apply the accumulated credits after 85 percent of the sentence imposed has been served provided; however, in no instance will the application of earned credits result in the immediate discharge of the person from custody. It requires the granting of earned credits to be at the discretion of the Director based on certain criteria. The bill passed by a vote of 96 to 1.

-HB 3167, by Rep. Jeff Hickman, eliminates designated maximum and minimum speed limits and requires the Department of Transportation to determine maximum speed limits based on engineering and traffic investigations used to determine the speed that is reasonable and safe under the conditions found to exist on the highway or part of the highway. The bill passed by a vote of 86 to 8.

-HJR 1038, by Rep. Doug Cox and Sen. Robert Standridge, requires all services provided to Medicaid recipients admitted as inpatients in a hospital be considered as acute, inpatient hospital services, regardless of the level of Medicaid reimbursement provided for such services. The measure passed by a vote of 88 to 0.

Wednesday, March 10, 2016


• On Wednesday, the Senate passed the following measures:

-SB 1423, by Sen. A.J. Griffin and Rep. Bobby Cleveland, allows students in grades nine through 12 who transfer from public to private schools, or private to public, to be eligible to participate in school-related extramural competitions governed by the Oklahoma Secondary School
Activities Association. The bill repeals existing language concerning transfer participation.

-SB 770, by Sen. Anthony Sykes and Rep. Dennis Johnson, includes the Judicial Nominating
Commission in the definition of Public Body in regards to the Oklahoma Open Meeting Act. The bill passed 40 to 4.

-SB 1112, by Sen. Gary Stanislawski and Rep. Scott Biggs, establishes the Land Mobile Radio Public Safety Interoperability Cooperative. The bill requires the Cooperative to be governed by a
committee consisting of the Secretary of Finance or designee, Secretary of Transportation or designee and the Secretary of the Safety and Security Cabinet or designee. The bill establishes the Cooperative to focus on unifying, stabilizing and enhancing the infrastructure and capabilities for land mobile radio public safety system communication. The bill establishes duties of the Cooperative. The bill passed 44 to 0.

-SB 1200, by Sen. A J Griffin and Rep. John Jordan, modifies language relating to an adjudicated child in need of supervision and who has violated a court order. The bill passed 44 to 0.

-SB 1233, by Sen. A J Griffin and Rep. John Paul Jordan, allows a youthful offender to remain in custody or under the supervision of the Office of Juvenile Affairs until the youthful offender's 19th birthday, at which time the youthful offender must be returned to the court for final disposition of the case. The bill passed 44 to 0.

-SB 1326, with title stricken, by Sen. Greg Treat and Rep. John Pfeiffer, requires two-thirds approval of the Senate of all compacts and cooperative agreements, as well as the renewal of any existing compacts or cooperative agreements. The bill removes the requirement that compacts and agreements with Native American tribes receive approval by the Joint Committee on State-Tribal Relations and replaces it with the requirement of two-thirds approval of the Senate. The bill removes exemptions from approval by the Joint Committee on State Tribal Relations for agreements with a tribe to run a juvenile detention facility. It adds a
requirement that every agreement with a tribe be field with the Senate President Pro Tempore. The bill passed 28 to 17.

-SB 1380, with title restored, by Sen. John Ford and Rep. Jadine Nollan, modifies graduation requirements by amending the description of laboratory science units or sets of competencies. It
expands the list of courses eligible to fulfill that requirement and reduces the number of required art units required. It adds computer education to the set of competencies required. The bill and its emergency clause passed 44 to 0.

-SB 1496, by Sen. Dan Newberry and Rep. Elise Hall, modifies definitions related to engineers and clarifies language and adds definitions related to qualifications of board members, powers of board, expenditures, annual reports, rosters, qualifications for licensure, applications, examinations and certificates. It allows the State Board of Licensure for Professional Engineers and Land Surveyors to give scholarships to individuals advancing toward obtaining an accredited degree in engineering or land surveying. The bill allows the Board to contract with other state agencies and nonprofit corporation for the endowment, management and administration of the scholarships. The bill allows the requirements of the scholarships to be determined by the
board. It allows the Board to use its funds to conduct instructional programs for people currently licensed to practice engineering or land surveying. The bill requires all employees of the Board to be considered unclassified service. The bill modifies the minimum requirement in order to be a licensed land surveyor. The bill modifies terms of licenses for engineers and land surveyors. The bill passed 42 to 2.

-SB1541, by Sen. A J Griffin and Rep. John Enns, modifies the duties of the State Department of Rehabilitation Services. The bill transfers all powers, duties, employees, functions, administrative rules and responsibilities of the Office of Disability Concerns to the State Department of Rehabilitation Services. It requires the transfer to include all equipment, supplies, records, assets, current and future liabilities, fund balances, encumbrances, obligations, and indebtedness associated with the Office of Disability Concerns, on July 1, 2016. It requires that any monies accruing to or in the name of the Office of Disability Concerns on and after the effective date, or any monies that accrue in any funds or accounts or are maintained for the benefit of the Office on and after the effective date to be transferred to the State Department of Rehabilitation Services. It requires the Department to succeed to any contractual rights and responsibilities incurred by the Office. It requires the Director of the Office of Management and Enterprise Services to coordinate the transfer of funds, allotments, purchase orders, and outstanding financial obligations or encumbrances as provided. It requires the Commission on Rehabilitation to promulgate rules. It repeals language relating to the Office of Disability Concerns. The bill passed 44 to 2.

-SB 1556, by Sen. Dan Newberry and Rep. Dan Kirby, modifies the members of the Construction Industries Board making 10 appointed by the Governor and eliminating the member appointed by the board. The bill also modifies the qualification of the Governor's appointee who must be a Certified Building Official (CBO) to allow them to be a CBO or a Master Code Professional (MCP). It adds that one member must have experience in commercial building management who is a member of a statewide organization representing commercial building owners and managers. The bill provides that codes adopted by the Oklahoma Uniform Building Code Commission will be the state minimum. The bill clarifies language related to continuing education offered by private entities. The bill removes outdated language. The bill grants the Oklahoma Uniform Building Code Commission the power to provide continuing education for the residential and commercial construction industry professional. The bill passed 43 to 0.

-SJR 71, by Sen. Josh Brecheen and Rep. Jeff Coody, proposes a vote of the people on a constitutional amendment that would authorize the Legislature to appropriate earnings from the Tobacco Settlement Trust Fund to the Oklahoma Medicaid program. The resolution passed 33 to 11.

-SB 1057, by Sen. Jack Fry and Rep. Kevin Calvey, passed 45 to 1 as amended and with its title restored. The bill prohibits the holder of an event permit from establishing a policy or rule that has
the effect of prohibiting any person from carrying a concealed or unconcealed firearm on property unless: a portion of the property or building is owned or controlled by city, town, county, state or federal government, is a sports field, the fairgrounds during the Oklahoma State Fair and the Tulsa State Fair, or a portion of the property is under contract to a business or not for profit entity. The bill also prohibits the entity from liability arising from the carrying of a concealed or unconcealed weapon on the property but allows a person who has suffered a loss from the discharge of a weapon to seek redress or damaged of the person who discharged the weapon outside of the provisions of the Oklahoma Self-Defense Act. The amendment clarifies the bill's language regarding parking lots, providing there will be no exclusions for particular sporting events.

-FS for SB 1113, by Sen. David Holt and Rep. Randy Grau, permits the court to order the plaintiff in any civil asset forfeiture proceeding in which the defendant or claimant prevails to pay from funds generated by seizure and forfeiture actions: reasonable attorney fees and other litigation costs reasonably incurred by the defendant or claimant directly related to the claim on which
the defendant or claimant prevailed; post judgment interest; and in cases involving currency or other negotiable instruments, interest actually paid to the state from the date of seizure or arrest of the property that resulted from the investment of the property in an interest-bearing account or instrument, and an imputed amount of interest that such currency, instruments, or proceeds would have earned at the rate applicable to the thirty-day Treasury Bill, for any period during which no interest was paid, not including any period when the property reasonably was in use as
evidence in an official proceeding or in conducting scientific tests for the purpose of collecting evidence, commencing 15 days after the property was seized by a law enforcement agency or was turned over to a law enforcement agency by a federal law enforcement authority.

-SB 1122, by Sen. A J Griffin and Rep. Kevin Calvey, amended and with its title restored. The amendment changed the focus of the directive in the bill. It now requires the Corporation Commission to work in conjunction with the Secretary of Energy and Environment, the Oklahoma Water Resources Board and the Department of Environmental Quality to encourage industrial use of water produced in oil and natural gas operations rather than to implement recommendations of the Water for 2060 Produced Water Working Group.

-The FS for SB 1257, by Sen. David Holt, Sen. Gary Stanislawski, and Rep. John Jordan, makes non-consensual dissemination of private sexual images as unlawful. The bill, also identified as the revenge porn bill, defines terms relating to non-consensual dissemination. The bill requires violators of the act to be guilty of a misdemeanor and subsequent violations to be a felony. The floor sub adds language clarifying that the dissemination must be intentional.

–FS for SB1561, by Sen. Ralph Shortey and Rep. Mike Christian, creates the Unified Law Enforcement Act of 2016, which consolidates four state law enforcement agencies and establishes that the divisions of the Oklahoma Department of Law Enforcement will consist of the Department of Public Safety, Oklahoma Highway Patrol, Oklahoma State Bureau of Investigation and Oklahoma State Bureau of Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs Control. The bill provides the Superintendent of the Oklahoma Department of Law Enforcement will supervise the department and may, at the time of its formation, transfer persons and assets as may be necessary for the operation of the department from any of the initial divisions. The bill creates the seven-member Oklahoma Law Enforcement Commission. It establishes commission membership requirements. The bill sets requirements for the commission. The bill establishes the powers, duties and responsibilities of the commission. The bill creates the office of and sets the qualifications, duties and authority of the Superintendent for the Oklahoma Department of Law Enforcement.
The bill requires the current Commissioner of Public Safety, Chief of the Oklahoma Highway Patrol Division, Director of the Oklahoma State Bureau of Investigation and Director of the Oklahoma State Bureau of Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs Control be affirmed by the Commission as the Director or Chief of their respective agency. It requires all functions performed by the Department of Public Safety, Oklahoma Highway Patrol, Oklahoma State Bureau of Investigation and Oklahoma State Bureau of Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs Control remain under the respective agency unless otherwise modified, merged or reorganized by the Superintendent of the Oklahoma Department of Law Enforcement. It requires the elimination or renaming of any of the listed agencies require approval of the Commission. The bill modifies language concerning each law enforcement agency to conform. The bill abolishes the Oklahoma State Bureau of Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs Control Commission and the Oklahoma State Bureau of Investigation Commission and directs their duties and powers assumed and performed
by the Oklahoma Department of Law Enforcement. It directs statutory references to the OBNDD Commission and the OSBI Commission to be deemed a reference to the Oklahoma Department of Law Enforcement. The bill removes the exemption for CompSource Oklahoma from the provisions of the Oklahoma Surplus Property Act. The bill repeals statutory language creating the OBNDD Commission and the OSBI Commission. The measure passed by a vote of 27-19.

-SB 866, with title restored, by Sen. Clark Jolley and Rep. Doug Cox, repeals language that requires the Office of the State Medical Examiner to be located immediately adjacent to or in close proximity to the University of Central Oklahoma Forensic Science Institute. The bill adds language that permits the Board of Medicolegal Investigations to determine where the office will be located. The bill and its emergency clause passed 40 to 0.

-SB 952, by Sen. Susan Paddack and Rep. Todd Thomsen clarifies language related to off-duty peace officers assisting bail enforcers. The bill specifying only full-time certified and commissioned Oklahoma peace officers may assist bail enforcers. The bill prohibits officers engaged in recovery and surrender from wearing any clothing marked "police" or use any other words or phrases that imply they are associated with law enforcement or a government
agency; or to use any vehicle marked "police" or with any other words or phrases that imply the person is associated with law enforcement or a government agency; or to display their official peace officer badge, unless upon receipt of a law enforcement officer. It requires officers engaged in a recovery and surrender to wear clothing clearly marked "bail enforcer" or "bail enforcement." The bill also modifies language concerning when a bail enforcer license or
armed bail enforcer license will be subject to administrative or fine by the Council on Law Enforcement Education and Training. The bill passed 43 to 1.

-SB 959, by Sen. Susan Paddack and Rep. Todd Thomsen, modifies the definition of a retired federal, state, county or municipal peace officer to an individual who has served as a peace officer for an aggregate of 10 years or more and has completed any applicable probationary period of such service, due to a service-connected disability before such separation from service with an agency. The bill allows the Council on Law Enforcement Education and Training (CLEET) to issue an identification card to eligible federal, state, county and municipal peace officers which authorizes the retired peace officer to carry a firearm anywhere in the State of Oklahoma which expires every 10 years. The bill sets requirements for the renewal of the license. The bill modifies the procedure for application of such license. The bill passed 44 to 0.

-SB 1056, with title restored, by Sen. Jack Fry and Rep. Gary Banz, allows all photographs, videotape or other recorded images for the exclusive use of the Oklahoma Turnpike Authority to be used in any court in the case of an investigation or prosecution for a criminal violation. It requires that such records be available to a law enforcement officer or law enforcement agency upon request for law enforcement purposes related to an investigation or prosecution of a criminal violation of the laws of the state upon the issuance of a search warrant, subpoena, or order of the court. The bill passed 42 to 1.

-SB 1117, by Sen. Nathan Dahm and Rep. Jason Murphey, requires that a public body that holds a meeting by video conference maintain a quorum of members for the entire duration of the meeting whether using an in-person site, videoconference sites or any combination of such sites to achieve a quorum. The bill passed 37 to 7.

-SB 1123, by Sen. Kim David and Rep. Dan Kirby, adds and modifies definitions to terms
used therein relating to the Oklahoma Real Estate Code. The bill passed 37 to 7.

-SB 1202, by Sen. Kim David and Rep. Mike Christian, modifies the makeup of the Council on Law Enforcement Education and Training to include one member appointed by the District Attorneys Council. The bill and its emergency clause passed 43 to 2.

-SB 1215, with title restored, by Sen. Clark Jolley and Rep. Earl Sears, excludes the Commissioners of the Land Office from the requirement of using construction manager, consultant and construction contract forms to utilize certain services by the Office of Management and Enterprise Services. The bill and its emergency clause passed 43-0.

-SB 1220, by Sen. Clark Jolley and Rep. Dennis Ray Casey, modifies the requirements of reimbursement rates from the Department of Corrections to a county. The bill requires a negotiated daily rate to be settled if the amount to retain the inmate exceeds $27 per day. The bill requires the presiding district judge to establish a rate if the Department and the county do not agree upon a rate. The bill passed 44 to 0.

-SB 1221, by Sen. Kim David and Rep. Pam Peterson, creates Kari's Law. The bill requires a business owner or operator that owns a telephone enabled service to configure the system to allow a person initiating a 9-1-1 call on the system to directly access 9-1-1 without an additional codes, prefix or postfix. The bill requires Telephone service providers and Interconnected VoIP Service providers to annually provide written notification detailing the provisions of this act to any current commercial customers operating in this state who may be affected by this act. The bill
passed 33 to 11.

-SB 1275, with title restored, by Sen. Clark Jolley and Rep. Charles McCall, creates the 11-member Task Force for the Study of the Oklahoma Sales Tax Code and establishes it purpose. It establishes membership requirements. The bill establishes meeting requirements. The bill provides the task force will be subject to the Open Meetings Act and the Open Records Act. The bill requires staff assistance to be provided by the Oklahoma Tax Commission, the House and the Senate. The bill requires the task force to submit a report to the Governor, the Senate President Pro Tempore and the House Speaker by Dec. 1, 2017. The bill requires the task force report and recommendations to include a draft of a state question to be sent to a vote of the people at the general election which occurs in 2018. The bill passed 46 to 0.

-SB 1282, with title restored, by Sen Clark Jolley, directs the Oklahoma Tax Commission to enhance its efforts to discover and reduce fraud and abuse of sales tax exemptions. The bill exempts from the sales tax the sale, use or consumption of paper stock and other raw materials which are manufactured into commercial printed material in this state primarily for use and delivery outside this state. The bill states that for the purposes of this section "commercial
printed material" includes magazines, catalogs, retail inserts and direct mail. The bill passed 45 to 1.

-SB 1291, by Sen. John Sparks and Rep. Scott Inman, requires the Department of Environmental Quality to seek and include any response submitted to them by any of Oklahoma's federally
recognized tribal governments in preparing any response on behalf of the State of Oklahoma to the federal government on any issue pertaining to the federal Clean Air Act, the Oklahoma Clean Air Act, modifications to air emission standards or any air quality issue. The bill passed 32 to 12.

-SB 1316, with title stricken, by Sen. John Sparks and Rep. Scott Martin, creates the Oklahoma Public and Private Facilities and Infrastructure Act, due to a need for public infrastructure and government facilities in this state that serve a public need and purpose. The bill provides for the purpose of the Act. The bill defines terms. The bill requires a contracting entity to obtain the approval of and contract with the responsible governmental entity under the Act in order to develop or operate a qualifying project. The bill provides for procedure and requirements for
proposals of qualifying projects. The bill provides for the approval process and authorizes governmental organization to enter into contracts. The bill specifies duties of the contract and specifies funding mechanisms. The bill provides for public access to records. The bill passed 33 to 11.

-SB 1499, as amended, by Sen. Rob Standridge and Rep Doug Cox, requires the Oklahoma Insurance Department to analyze discrepancies between coverage for prescription drugs with abuse-deterrent properties and coverage for prescription opioids without abuse-deterrent properties. It requires such information to be submitted in a report to the President Pro Tempore of the Senate and the Speaker of the House of Representatives on or before December 31, 2017. The amendment makes the Insurance Department's analysis subject to the availability of funding. The bill passed 43 to 1.

-SJR 45, with title restored, by Sen. John Ford and Sen. Mike Schulz, proposes a vote of
the people to amend the Constitution to increase from eight to 12 the number of years the Lieutenant Governor, State Auditor and Inspector, Attorney General, State Treasurer, Commissioner of Labor, Insurance Commissioner or Superintendent of Public Instruction may serve. The resolution passed 32 to 12.

-SJR 62, by Sen. John Sparks and Rep. Scott Martin, states legislative intent for the State of Oklahoma to immediately levy, collect and enforce such taxes on all vendors if the Courts or Congress act to compel all out-of-state sellers to collect sales and use taxes on nonexempt sales in the various states. The resolution passed 26 to 18.

-FS for SB 1362, by Sen. Corey Brooks, Sen. David Holt and Rep. Mike Christian, clarifies language related to driver licenses. The bill defines applicable terms. The bill also establishes the
requirements for REAL ID Compliant Driver Licenses and Identification Cards and REAL ID Non-Compliant Driver Licenses and Identification cards. The bill establishes a fee schedule for REAL ID Compliant Drivers Licenses. The bill requires that $10 from each REAL ID compliant license be deposited in the Department of Public Safety Revolving Fund. The bill removes language authorizing the Department of Public Safety and the Oklahoma Tax Commission to promulgate rules for the issuance of driver licenses and adds language that authorizes the Department of Public Safety to process applications for an issue all classes of driver licenses and identification
cards in any county. It authorizes DPS to promulgate rules for the issuance and renewal of driver licenses and authorizes motor license agents to process applications and issue driver licenses and identification cards only as permitted by the DPS administrative rules. It provides that the department or motor license agent will collect $4 to be deducted from the total collected for the license card, which will be deposited in the Department of Public Safety Revolving Fund or used for the motor license agents operating expenses, respectively. The bill clarifies language
related to the department's retention of images displayed on licenses. The bill prohibits a person from holding more than one state issued REAL ID compliant driver license or REAL ID compliant identification card, from Oklahoma or any other state. It prohibits the department from issuing a REAL ID compliant driver license to a person who has been previously issued a REAL ID compliant driver license or REAL ID compliant identification card until the license or identification card has been surrendered to the department by the applicant. It permits the department to
promulgate rules to address the issue of replacement REAL ID compliant driver license or identification cards in the event of one being lost or stolen. The bill clarifies language related to mailing and residence addresses.

• The Senate Joint Committee on Appropriations and Budget gave its approval Wednesday afternoon to the two bills that implement the three-part agreement for providing funding to the Department of Corrections and the Department of Education. Chair Clark Jolley said the committee substitutes for SB1571 and SB1572 represent an agreement he, House Speaker Jeff Hickman and Gov. Mary Fallin had announced just moments before the meeting to provide a total of $77.6 million to the two agencies. The CS for SB1571 appropriates $27.6 million from the Rainy Day Fund to the Department of Corrections. The CS for SB1572 appropriates $51.0 million from the Rainy Day Fund to the State Department of Education.

• The following bills were approved in the House on Wednesday:

-HB 1538, by Rep. Todd Thomsen and Sen. Don Barrington, contains provision for members of
the Oklahoma Law Enforcement Retirement System (OLERS) who have retired or retire with a service-connected disability to have their benefit equal to the greater of either 2.5 percent times the number of years of credit service times the top base pay currently paid to an active member for certain other law enforcement positions, or 2.5 percent times credited services times the member's final average salary. The bill and its emergency clause passed by a vote of 80 to 0.

-HB 1711, by Rep. Glen Mulready, modifies requirements for the insurance monthly premium rates for retired state employees under 65 at a rate that is between $100 less than the monthly premium for active employees and up to $100 more than the monthly premium for active employees. The bill passed by a vote of 73 to 5.

-HB 2254, by Rep. George Faught, R-Muskogee, amends to the Administrative Procedures Act. It modifies definition and modifies that the governor approves or disapproves rules. It allows the governor 45 calendar days from receipt of a rule to approve or disapprove it and directs him or her to notify the corresponding agency in writing of the approval; if disapproved, the governor must also notify the agency with reasons in writing for the disapproval. The bill requires the governor to notify the Speaker of the House and President Pro Tempore of the Senate as well. It adds that failure of the governor to approve a rule within the specified period shall constitute disapproval of the rule. The bill states that a transmission of a rule for legislative review on or before April 1 of each year will result in the approval of such rule by the Legislature if it is in regular session and it has failed to disapprove such rule before the last day of session unless such rule establishes or increases a fee or fees or is a rule by an agency, board of commission
created by or receives its authority from Title 59 of the Oklahoma Statutes. The bill passed by a vote of 95 to 1.

-HB 2260, as amended, by Rep. Chuck Hoskin and Sen. Susan Paddack, requires any persons 17 years of age or younger seeking a motorcycle driver license to successfully complete a certified basic rider course approved by the Department of Public Safety. The bill passed by a vote of 56 to 35. The emergency clause failed 43 to 38.

-HB 2280, with the title stricken, by Rep. Jason Murphey, requires the Department of Health to develop a classification system of violations to the Continuum of Care and Assisted Living Act. The bill requires that the department provide an itemized list containing found violations which will include each of the fines to be assessed upon the discovery of one or more violations. It allows the continuum of care facility or assisted living center to be given an opportunity to correct said violations. It allows fines to be assessed if the violations are not corrected within the time limits set forth in the accepted plan of correction. It requires that the Department develop the system in
consultation and coordination with the Long-Term Care Facility Advisory Board. The bill passed by a vote of 70 to 16.

-HB 2434, by Rep. Charles Joyner, requires a lender to notify the insured of each requirement with which the insured must comply for the lender to release the insurance proceeds not later than 10 days after the date the lender receives payment of the insurance proceeds if a claim under an insurance policy for damage to residential real property is paid to the insured and a lender, and the lender holds all or part of the proceeds from the insurance claim payment pending completion of all or part of the repairs to the property. It provides a list of actions after a lender receives a request for release from the insured of all or part of the insurance proceeds held by the
lender, not later than ten days after the date the lender receives said request. It requires a lender who fails to provide notice to pay to the insured interest at the rate of 10 percent a year on the proceeds held by the lender. It requires interest to begin to accrue on the date the lender receives sufficient evidence of the insured's compliance with the requirements specified by the lender under provisions listed for the release of proceeds. The bill does not require a lender to pay interest on insurance proceeds applied, in accordance with the terms and conditions of a deed of trust or other security agreement, to reduce a note. It provides a list of requirements for a lienholder if payment of an insurance claim relating to personal property requires the endorsement of a check or draft by a holder of a lien on the property or otherwise requires approval of the lienholder, not later than the fourteenth business day after the date the lienholder receives a request for the endorsement or other approval. It requires that a lienholder
who violates this section to be liable for a civil penalty not to exceed $500.00 for each violation. It authorizes the Attorney General to bring an action to collect a civil penalty. The bill passed by a vote of 86 to 1.

-HB 2637, by Rep. Kevin Wallace, creates the Hunting Freedom Act. The bill modifies language relating to means and exemptions by which a person may kill or capture any game mammal or bird, nongame bird or exotic wildlife. The bill passed by a vote of 82 to 10.

-HB 2670, by Rep. Cory T. Williams and Sen. David Holt, requires the agency that is processing a seizure and forfeiture pay from funds generated by seizure and forfeiture actions certain costs when the defendant or claimant prevails in a challenge of the seizure or forfeiture. The amendment mirrors the language in the Senate bill. The bill passed by a vote of 93 to 0.

-HB 2763, by Rep. John Montgomery, creates the Oklahoma Energy Revenues Stabilization Act, which requires the revenues from the gross production tax on oil and gas above a moving five-year average, in addition to revenue from corporate income tax above a five-year average, be deposited into a revolving fund to be known as the Energy Stabilization Fund. It requires the fund to be invested in a manner prescribed by the State Treasurer with the primary intent of generating returns, with all investment returns from the Energy Stabilization Fund to accrue to the balance of the fund. It provides that in the event that Energy Stabilization Fund should grow to a value equal to 75 percent of the February projection of gross production tax on oil and gas, all monies above the 75 percent level to be deposited to the credit of the General Revenue Fund for appropriation in the current fiscal year. The bill outlines legislative findings. It authorizes the State Treasurer to contract with a third-party firm for the purpose of consultation and assessment of the State of Oklahoma's oil and gas tax revenues and determining the best strategy for acquiring financial positions which may benefit the state. It directs the Treasurer to create a Revenue Protection
Strategy for the next fiscal year. The bill directs the Tax Commission to report to the State Treasurer the projected level of revenue that will be reported to the Board of Equalization at its December meeting. It adds that this projection shall be reported between five10 days before the December meeting of the Board of Equalization. The bill also creates the Board on Revenue Stabilization and provides for membership. It requires the board to meet within 48 hours of the December Board of Equalization revenue certification and directs the Treasurer to report to the
board findings from a third-party consultation. The bill requires the board to provide the Revenue Protection Strategy to meet the requirement of this act. The bill passed by a vote of 72 to 22.

-HB 2962, with the title stricken, as amended, by Rep. Jason Nelson and Sen. A J Griffin,requires a health benefit plan to provide coverage for the screening, diagnosis and treatment of autism spectrum disorder in individuals younger than 18. The bill prohibits coverage from setting limits on number of visits and requires coverage to be equal to other health benefit plans used by the individual. The bill sets a limit of $25,000 per year for applied behavior analysis and allows for inflation adjustment annually. The bill authorizes the insurer to review treatment plans and requires the Oklahoma Insurance Department to submit an annual report. The bill removes language specifying that certain coverage requirement must not include certain diagnostic and
treatment coverage for autism spectrum disorder. The amendment adds children on Medicaid to the provisions of the bill. The bill passed by a vote of 76 to 20.

-HB 3016, as amended, by Rep. Randy Grau and Sen. Nathan Dahm, creates the Parental Rights Immunization Act. The bill requires each health care provider who administers a vaccine set forth in the Vaccine Injury Table, as established by the United States Department of Health and Human Services, obtain informed consent from the legal representative of any child or other adult authorized by law to consent on behalf of a minor. It requires the health care provider to provide relevant information regarding benefits and risks of the vaccine as well as information concerning the National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program. The bill passed by a vote of 89 to 6.

-HB 3168, by Rep. Jeff Hickman, creates the Capitol Restoration and Modernization Act of 2016, which provides for a $125 million bond for Capitol repairs. The bill passed by a vote of 51 to 43.

-FS for HJR 1062, by Rep. Randy Grau, proposes a vote of the people for a constitutional
amendment to repeal Article 2, Section 5 of the Oklahoma Constitution, which provides that public money or property cannot be used directly or indirectly for any sect, church, denomination, or system of religion. The bill passed by a vote of 52 to 36.

-HB 2275, by Rep. Lee Denney and Sen. Clark Jolley, requiring the submission of DNA samples
from persons arrested for felony crimes. The bill requires a qualified arresting authority to collect the DNA sample. The bill requires the sample to be taken by peace officers, county sheriff or employees or contractors of the county sheriff's office. The bill states the persons collecting blood or saliva for DNA will be immune from civil liabilities arising from the process. The bill requires the samples to be mailed to the Oklahoma State Bureau of Investigation within 10 days. The bill allows for the DNA sample to not be analyzed and to be destroyed under certain circumstances.


Thursday, March 10, 2015


• On Thursday morning, the Senate passed several bills, including:

-SB 58 by Sen. Kim David and Rep. Lisa Billy, creates the Impaired Driving Elimination Act (IDEA). The bill establishes an assessment for violation of certain municipal ordinances; remits assessment to the Oklahoma Impaired Driver Database Revolving Fund; requires certain arrest reports be completed and entered into impaired driver database and establishes an assessment for misdemeanor and felony offenses involving driving under the influence of alcohol or other intoxicating substances. The bill passed 43-1

-SB1142, by Sen. Nathan Dahm and Rep Sean Roberts, requires any game warden investigating a hunter in the field to inform the hunter that it is necessary to obtain the consent of the landowner, lessee or occupant to hunt or take on the particular property. Measure passed 27-18.

-SB 1144, by Sen. Nathan Dahm and Rep. Ken Walker, creates the Automatic License Plate Reader Privacy Act. The bill prohibits certain use of automatic license plate reader systems. 45-0.

-SB1177, by Sen. Bryce Marlatt and Rep. Leslie Osborn, provides weight exemptions for natural gas vehicles.

-SB 1187 by Sen. Clark Jolley and Rep. Jeff Hickman, removed the requirements from the School District Empowerment Progam, such as deregulation from minimum salary schedule, certification requirements, retirement contributions and evaluations. The bill requires that 75 percent of students enrolled in a participating district or site, demonstrate mastery of the state academic content standards. It adds that a school district may demonstrate mastery if 50 percent of its students demonstrate more than one and one-half years of growth in a measured academic year. The bill requires a district that is unable to demonstrate mastery in this manner, to implement one of four intervention models provided for in state statute. 25-20.

-SB 1379, by Sen. Dan Newberry and Rep. David Brumbaugh, prohibits the Department of Environmental Quality from adopting certain rules pertaining to the federal Clean Power Plan. The measure was approved 34-8.


Other news this week

• The Oklahoma Department of Transportation Director, Mike Patterson said this week ODOT will likely have to move at least one of the projects on this year's list from the eight-year plan into next year after the agency took another cut the program's primary funding source. The department learned last week that its Rebuilding Oklahoma Access and Driver Safety (ROADS) Fund would
receive a 4.0 percent cut as a result of the current fiscal year revenue failure declared by Office of Management and Enterprise Services Director Preston Doerflinger. The 4.0 percent reduction amounts to $17.6 million, commissioners were told. As a result of the original revenue failure declared at the end of December, the department lost $13.2 million. Combined, that amounts to a $30.8 million loss for the year.


• Mary Fallin signed the first bill of the 2016 legislative session this week when she approved a measure on Monday moving the Will Rogers Memorial Commission under the control of the Oklahoma Historical Society. The bill, SB1570, transfers all property of the Will Rogers Memorial Commission to the Oklahoma Historical Society and places the governance of the commission under the Oklahoma Historical Society.

The legislation was authored by Sen. Clark Jolley, Sen. Greg Treat, Rep. Dennis Ray Casey, and Rep. Earl Sears. The bill did not become a law in the usual manner, as it was filed Feb. 16, nearly a month after the deadline for the introduction of bills and joint resolutions, and routed through the Joint Committees on Appropriations (JCAB). It passed the Senate 40 to 0 on Feb. 25 and the House 85 to 9 on March 2. The bill, which has an emergency clause, takes effect immediately.


• The Oklahoma Corporation Commission announced Monday a plan to reduce wastewater injections in a seven-county areas as part of its response to triggered earthquakes and an expansion of the so called "yellow light" area, where other restrictions are in place.
The Commission's Oil and Gas Conservation Division (OGCD) Director Tim Baker said the central Oklahoma action will cover more than 5,000 square miles and affect more than 400 Arbuckle disposal wells. It is similar to the regional response strategy that was instituted Feb. 16 in western Oklahoma.

In a separate action, the OGCD also expanded the size of the "Area of Interest" (AOI), bringing more restrictions to disposal well operations in areas that have not yet seen major earthquake activity. In January, the commission implemented a reduction in wastewater injection in the area after two 4-plus magnitude quakes struck near Sooner and Covell roads in Edmond. Notification of well operators began on Thursday, March 3. It is important to note that researchers agree that any decrease in earthquakes that may result from such plans is rarely immediate, and must be evaluated over the course of several months, the commission noted. The central Oklahoma volume reduction plan will be phased in over two months in keeping with recommendations
from researchers, who warn against sudden pressure changes. The first stage started Monday.

• More than half a million dollars has been returned to Oklahomans in just under a year with the Oklahoma Insurance Department's Lost Life Policy Locator Service. The free tool helps people find a life insurance policy or annuity contract left by a deceased loved one. The Oklahoma Insurance Department (OID) has received 429 requests to search for lost policies in the last year. To date, OID has located 29 policies and recovered $534,483.69 for Oklahomans. The Lost Life Policy Locator Service requires consumers submit necessary information about the deceased
including a copy of the death certificate. Then, OID will contact all state-licensed life insurance companies asking them to search their records for any life insurance policies or annuity contracts insuring the deceased. If a policy is found, that insurance company will contact the beneficiary to complete the claim. The entire process usually takes about 45-60 days.

• The Oklahoma State Department of Health presented a budget reduction plan Tuesday to the State Board of Health for the remainder of the current fiscal year and to prepare for reductions in FY2017. State budget officials announced a 3.0 percent reduction in General Revenue Fund allocations in late December. That level was increased an additional 4.0 percent beginning this month for a combined annualized reduction of 7.0 percent. For the State Department of Health, that amounts to a $4.2 million loss for FY2016, the current fiscal year. According to the department, the agency has received a 25 percent reduction in state appropriations since 2009,
from $75 million dollars to $56 million dollars, which includes the latest round of budget cuts announced Thursday.

To meet the latest reductions, the department plans to eliminate funding to Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHC) to start new clinic sites and pay for care for Oklahomans who are uninsured. In addition, the OSDH has eliminated funding to establish a Cord Blood Bank, eliminated dental health education as a service and reduced funding for colorectal cancer screening for the uninsured by half. In preparation for continued budget cuts in FY2017, the agency is recommending the closure of five to seven county health department sites. For those who are able to travel the distance, regional services will be provided to residents of those areas. OSDH will also notify contractors of Oklahoma Child Abuse Prevention (OCAP) services that funding will be discontinued starting FY 2017. The department has also offered an incentive to retirement eligible employees to retire in this year which will result in the elimination of approximately 90 positions, creating savings in the next fiscal year.

• Mary Fallin announced an agreement with legislative leaders Wednesday to tap into the state's Rainy Day Fund to help offset the impact of the budget cuts to common education and corrections. Fallin said $51.0 million would be pulled from the fund for the Department of Education and $27.6 million for the Oklahoma Department of Corrections (DOC). The fund contains $385 million in total, with $144.4 million available to address the FY2016 revenue failure.